Skip Navigation

Modern Languages & Literatures Courses

Course information found here includes all permanent offerings and is updated regularly whenever Academic Senate approves changes. For historical information, see the Course Catalogs. For actual course availability in any given term, use Course Search in the Portal.

Chinese Courses

CHIN 100. First-Year Chinese I (1). These beginning courses offer an introduction to Mandarin. Class sessions stress the acquisition of basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Approximately 600 traditional characters are introduced, more than 1,000 combined words and phrases, and basic grammatical structures in Mandarin. (1S) Offered each year.

CHIN 103. Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture (½). Open to students with no Chinese language background, this course introduces some basic elements of Chinese such as its dialectal systems, the history and methods of its writing form, the pictographic signs related to myth and legends of cultural origins, and some basic grammatical patterns of Mandarin. The course also teaches basic vocabulary of everyday communication and Chinese character-writing. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Taught in English.

CHIN 105. First-Year Chinese II (1). These beginning courses offer an introduction to Mandarin. Class sessions stress the acquisition of basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Approximately 600 traditional characters are introduced, more than 1,000 combined words and phrases, and basic grammatical structures in Mandarin. (1S) Offered each year. Prerequisite: Chinese 100.

CHIN 110. Second-Year Chinese I (1). Through aural, oral, and compositional exercises and reading selections, these courses build upon prior competencies. After a review of basic grammatical structures and characters, students add more traditional and simplified characters to sharpen reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. This course aims to transfer the knowledge students gained from the character-pattern approach at the beginning level to work with original Chinese texts at the advanced level. (1S) Offered each year. Prerequisite: Chinese 105 or equivalent.

CHIN 115. Second-Year Chinese II (1). Through aural, oral, and compositional exercises and reading selections, these courses build upon prior competencies. After a review of basic grammatical structures and characters, students add more traditional and simplified characters to sharpen reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. This course aims to transfer the knowledge students gained from the character-pattern approach at the beginning level to work with original Chinese texts at the advanced level. (1S) Offered each year. Prerequisite: Chinese 110.

CHIN 200. Third-Year Chinese I (1). Continuing the combined written, aural, oral, and culture components, these third-year courses guide students through selected readings in contemporary literature and newspapers, in both traditional and simplified characters. Conducted mainly in Chinese, these courses stress vocabulary expansion in both speaking and writing. (1S) Prerequisite: Chinese 115 or consent of instructor.

CHIN 205. Third-Year Chinese II (1). Continuing the combined written, aural, oral, and culture components, these third-year courses guide students through selected readings in contemporary literature and newspapers, in both traditional and simplified characters. Conducted mainly in Chinese, these courses stress vocabulary expansion in both speaking and writing. (1S) Prerequisite: Chinese 200.

CHIN 220. Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese (1). With selected review of grammar and development of vocabulary, this course develops fluency of expression through reading, writing, and speaking Chinese. The readings are unedited originals from contemporary Chinese literature and expository prose. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Taught in Chinese. (1S) Prerequisite: Chinese 205 or consent of instructor.

CHIN 230. Readings in Classical Chinese (1). This introduction to the classical Chinese language is intended for students who have already completed two years of study of modern Chinese. It aims to provide students with a systematic knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary of the classical language. The focus is on reading and translating narrative and philosophical texts for the Spring and Autumn, Warring States and Han periods. Selections are drawn from Liezi, Lunyu, Mengzi, and Shiji among other works. Taught both in English and modern Chinese. Prerequisite: Chinese 115 or consent of instructor.

CHIN 250. Masterpieces of Chinese Literature I: pre-Qin to Tang (1). This course provides students with an introduction to Chinese literature from circa 1000 B.C.E. to the end of the Tang dynasty (907 C.E.). Readings are drawn from a wide range of genres, including myth, philosophical argument, history, biography, letters, and essays. Special attention is paid to the development of the poetic tradition from the Shi Jing (classic of poetry) to the shi (regulated verse) of the Tang. Taught in English. (5T)

CHIN 255. Masterpieces of Chinese Literature II: Song to the Present (1). This course is a continuation of Chinese 250. We follow the development of the poetic tradition after Tang, reading representative works in the ci (lyric) and qu (aria) forms. We also chart the rise of vernacular narrative and the drama. Our survey of modern Chinese fiction and poetry (post 1890) assesses the impact of Western models and the persistence of traditional themes and attitudes. Taught in English. (5T)

CHIN 260. Selected Topics in Chinese Civilization (in translation) (1). A seminar course involving study of selected topics in Chinese civilization. Topics may focus on a particular theme, such as an introduction to traditional Chinese culture, examination of a period, foreign influence on Chinese society, intersections of culture and society, Chinese cinema, arts and calligraphy. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Taught in English.

CHIN 280. Chinese Literature: Historical Genres and Modes (1). In this course, students investigate the themes and formal properties of particular genres of Chinese literature. An emphasis is placed on situating literary works in their cultural and historical contexts. Possible topics include: contemporary fiction, modern drama, traditional poetry and poetics, traditional drama, and classical tales. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Taught in English. (5T)

CHIN 390. Special Projects (.25 - 1). Individual work under faculty supervision with evaluation based on appropriate evidence of achievement. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

CHIN 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit.

French Courses

FREN 100. Elementary French I (1). Essentials of French grammar. Composition, conversation, and oral practice. Reading of French prose. Four hours of classroom instruction and recitation and two hours of independent preparation for each classroom hour, including laboratory-type exercises, are required. Students are graded, in part, on their command of oral use of French. (1S) Offered each year.

FREN 105. Elementary French II (1). Essentials of French grammar. Composition, conversation, and oral practice. Reading of French prose. Four hours of classroom instruction and recitation and two hours of independent preparation for each classroom hour, including laboratory-type exercises, are required. Students are graded, in part, on their command of oral use of French. (1S) Offered each year. Prerequisite: French 100.

FREN 110. Intermediate French (1). This course continues to develop oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills in French through readings and discussions of cultural materials from France and other Francophone countries. These include literary texts and texts on contemporary issues. The course also includes a thorough review of French grammar and extensive oral work using CDs and computer support. (1S) Prerequisite: French 105 or equivalent.

FREN 210. French Conversation and Composition (1). Speaking, reading, and writing French with a view to developing fluency in expression. Required of all majors. (1S) Prerequisite: French 110 or equivalent.

FREN 215. Advanced French Language and Composition (1). This course covers complex grammar points, oral expression, and vocabulary building. It particularly emphasizes written expression through structured writing assignments, including culture reviews, essays, letters, and stories. Cultural materials include films and longer texts including novels. Required of all majors. (1S) Prerequisite: French 210 or equivalent.

FREN 220. French and Francophone Civilizations (1). The reading of a variety of texts based on the culture and the life of France and the Francophone world. Discussion of current events to develop oral expression. Required of all teaching majors. (5T) Prerequisite: French 210 or 215 or consent of instructor.

FREN 240. Character of French Literature (1). An introduction to French literature that presumes no previous preparation in French literature. Works are selected for all periods except the Medieval. An attempt is made to define the three major genres. Comparison and contrast of themes and literary devices. Versification and literary terminology. (5T) Prerequisite: French 215 or consent of instructor.

FREN 280. Caribbean Literature in French (1). Reading some of the most acclaimed literary works and critical essays written by French Caribbean writers from Négritude to Créolité, we will focus on the themes, motifs, symbols and other literary devices used to articulate their reflections, dilemmas, perplexities, and choices. The literary production of French Caribbean intellectuals has revealed an original poetics and a political consciousness, both challenging the French literary traditions and revising French history. Some of the themes include (neo)colonialism, hybridity, identity, authenticity, (re)writing “Caribbeanness.” (5T) Prerequisite: French 240 or consent of instructor.

FREN 285. The Francophone Novel (1). This course explores the development of the Francophone novel in a variety of post-colonial contexts worldwide. These include the Caribbean, the Maghreb, Quebec, and Sub-Saharan Africa. An emphasis will be placed on innovative narrative techniques and on the cultural, economic, political, and social contexts of writing in former French colonies. (5T) Prerequisite: French 240 or consent of instructor.

FREN 290. The French Novel and the Cinema (1). Analysis of several novels and screenplays of different periods, from La Bête humaine to Hiroshima mon amour, in comparison with their filmed versions in order to examine various modes of interpretation in two media. (5T) Prerequisite: French 240 or consent of instructor.

FREN 295. The Rational and Irrational in Contemporary French Literature (1). French literature since 1900, with emphasis on the reaction in poetry, prose, and theatre against traditional logic and reason, including Bergson, l’esprit nouveau, Dada, André Breton and Surrealism, and contemporary absurdists. (5T) Prerequisite: French 240 or consent of instructor.

FREN 360. French Literary Studies (.5, 1). Special areas of literature based on the particular interests and background of the instructor. Topics may focus on a single author or literary work, literary theories, or on a particular theme. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. (5T) Prerequisite: French 240 or consent of the instructor.

FREN 380. Seminar (1). Reports on special topics in French culture, literature, and literary criticism. Required of all majors. Prerequisite: French 240, or consent of instructor.

FREN 390. Special Projects (.25 - 1). Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

FREN 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit.

FREN 396. Teaching Assistant Research (.5). Course and curriculum development projects with faculty.

German Courses

GERM 100. German in Everyday Life I (1). An introduction to the German language and its use in everyday life. Highly communicative classroom work facilitates acquisition of key language skills, such as speaking, listening, reading, and writing. All coursework fosters cultural competency by drawing on cross-cultural comparison to build knowledge of contemporary Germany. (1S) Offered each fall.

GERM 105. German in Everyday Life II (1) Completion of the introduction to German begun in GERM 100. By focusing on structures and vocabulary needed to negotiate every day interactions successfully, such as making friends, talking about hobbies, shopping, and university study, course work encourages students to reflect on their own identities through the lens of German culture. (1S) Offered each spring. Prerequisite: German 100 or equivalent.

GERM 110. Intermediate German I: What is German? (1) A wide selection of cultural content introduces students to the way regional differences affect German identity. German grammar is reviewed broadly with particular emphasis on recognizing and utilizing different registers of spoken and written German. Students develop competency reading, discussing, and writing about newspaper articles, television interviews, blogs, and personal essays. (1S) Offered each fall. Prerequisite: German 105 or equivalent.

GERM 210. Intermediate German II: Contemporary German Cultures (1) This writing intensive course builds competency in reading and composing sophisticated German texts. Through the study of Germanic cultures beyond Germany and the role of migration within German-speaking countries, students explore the nuances of contemporary German cultures. A wide range of written work (letters, editorials, blogs, reviews, essays) builds on classroom discussions, debates, and presentations. (1S) Offered each spring. Prerequisite: German 110 or equivalent.

GERM 218 Advanced German Texts and Contexts: German Youth Cultures (1) This course uses discussion of diverse cultural products – novels, music, film, essays, websites – around the theme of German youth culture to refine all aspects of German language use. Classroom work and assignments focus on developing close reading skills, enhancing presentational and interpersonal communication skills. Students gain an understanding of youth culture’s global reach as well as its local transformations. (5T) Prerequisite: German 210, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

GERM 220: Topics in German Culture (1) An advanced course in German with a rotating focus on a particular literary genre (drama, novel, autobiography), medium, or broad theme. Possible topics include Germans in love, the idea of nature in German Romanticism and environmentalism, post-1945 literature, and migration and exile. Students returning from study abroad will be expected to draw on their experiences for course work. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. (5T) Prerequisite: German 210 or equivalent or consent of instructor; German 218 recommended.

GERM 250: German Studies (1) Topic varies from term to term. Possible topics include: minority voices in contemporary German literature, German film, sport and body culture, transnational Germany, Berlin vs. Vienna, Kafka and the Kafkaesque, Critical theory and the Frankfurt School, as well as various comparative studies of German literature and culture. May be taught in English or German. (5T)

GERM 390. Special Projects (.25 - 1). Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

GERM 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit.

GERM 396. Teaching Assistant Research (.5). Course and curriculum development projects with faculty.

Hungarian Courses

HUNG 100. Elementary Hungarian I (1). Essentials of Hungarian grammar, composition, conversation, and oral practice. Appropriate readings from Hungarian writers. (1S) Offered each spring.

HUNG 390. Special Projects (.25 - 1). Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

HUNG 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit.

Japanese Courses

JAPN 100. First-Year Japanese I (1). Provides a foundation in basic Japanese. Students learn most of the basic Japanese grammatical patterns, the two phonetic alphabets, Hiragana and Katakana, as well as approximately 100 Chinese characters (Kanji). Instruction and training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. (1S) Offered each year.

JAPN 105. First-Year Japanese II (1). Provides a foundation in basic Japanese. Students learn most of the basic Japanese grammatical patterns, the two phonetic alphabets, Hiragana and Katakana, as well as approximately 100 Chinese characters (Kanji). Instruction and training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. (1S) Offered each year.

JAPN 110 Second-Year Japanese I (1). A thorough review of the basic patterns of Japanese. Continue work with Kanji. Classes taught in Japanese to stress training in listening comprehension, speaking, and composition. (1S) Offered each year. Prerequisite: Japanese 105 or consent of instructor.

JAPN 115. Second-Year Japanese II (1). A thorough review of the basic patterns of Japanese. Continue work with Kanji. Classes taught in Japanese to stress training in listening comprehension, speaking, and composition. (1S) Offered each year. Prerequisite: Japanese 110 or consent of instructor.

JAPN 200. Third-Year Japanese I (1). These courses aim to expand students’ basic skills in the Japanese language and deepen their knowledge of Japanese culture. New speech styles and new Kanji are introduced. Students will read simple essays and write short compositions. Classes will be taught in Japanese. (1S) Prerequisite: Japanese 115 or consent of instructor.

JAPN 205. Third-Year Japanese II (1). These courses aim to expand students’ basic skills in the Japanese language and deepen their knowledge of Japanese culture. New speech styles and new Kanji are introduced. Students will read simple essays and write short compositions. Classes will be taught in Japanese. (1S) Prerequisite: Japanese 200 or consent of instructor.

JAPN 215. Advanced Japanese Language and Composition (1). This course develops advanced skills in both spoken and written Japanese. Sophisticated writing skills are cultivated through frequent composition assignments. Student presentations and class discussions train students to express complex thoughts orally in Japanese. Reading materials cover a wide range of cultural and social issues. In addition, a variety of materials, such as TV programs, newspapers, audiotapes, videos, and Internet resources are used. The course is conducted almost exclusively in Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 205.

JAPN 220. Readings in Japanese Civilization (1). A seminar course involving an examination of significant aspects of past and contemporary Japanese society and culture, with an aim of increasing fluency in reading and providing opportunity for hearing and speaking Japanese. Students read authentic Japanese language materials; study relevant Japanese language websites and videos; and write papers and give presentations in Japanese. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. (1S) Prerequisite: Japanese 205.

JAPN 225. Topics in Business Japanese (1). A seminar course involving an examination of significant aspects of higher level Japanese communication skills necessary for success in the business world. This course covers formal Japanese language and manners for business, speaking techniques for job interviews, rapid reading skills, and preparation for the Japanese language proficiency test. Students read authentic Japanese language materials, study relevant Japanese language websites and videos; and write papers and give presentations in Japanese. (1S) Prerequisite: Japanese 205.

JAPN 230. Readings in Japanese Literature (1). A seminar course involving intensive textual analysis in Japanese of selected works of both classical and modern Japanese literature. Topics may focus on a single author or text, or on a particular theme, such as text and image, constructions of gender, history of Japanese poetry, postmodern Japan. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Prerequisite: Japanese 205.

JAPN 240. Introduction to Japanese Literature (1). This course surveys Japanese literature from ancient to modern times, covering various genres such as diaries, essays, poetry, and fiction. Organized chronologically, the readings offer students the opportunity to see how literary concepts established in ancient periods undergo transformations through the ages while maintaining their basic tenets—those of the “Japanese mind.” Taught in English. (5T)

JAPN 260. Selected Topics in Japanese Literature (in translation) (1). A seminar course involving intensive textual analysis of particular topics in Japanese literature. Topics may center on a single theme, author, genre, or literary period. Possible genres, themes, and authors include: gothic literature, America in Japanese literature, modern literature, Kawabata, Natsume, Mishima, and Tanizaki. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Taught in English. (5T)

JAPN 280. Japanese Popular Culture and Literature (1). Dealing with popular Japanese media—manga (comics), popular novels, film, and animation—this course offers a critical examination of how they are reflected in Japanese culture through time. To approach these popular forms of expression, various theoretical readings will be assigned for discussion. Since manga and animation are very popular not only in Japan but also in the United States and elsewhere, studying these media is important to understanding an increasingly global youth culture. Taught in English. (5T)

JAPN 390. Special Projects (.25 - 1). Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

JAPN 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit.

JAPN 396. Teaching Assistant Research (.5). Course and curriculum development projects with faculty.

Russian Courses

RUSS 100. Elementary Russian I (1). Essential Russian grammar. Oral practice and composition. Four hours of classroom instruction. Two additional hours of independent practice in the laboratory are required weekly. Students are graded, in part, on their command of the oral use of Russian. (1S) Offered each year.

RUSS 105. Elementary Russian II (1). Essential Russian grammar. Oral practice and composition. Four hours of classroom instruction. Two additional hours of independent practice in the laboratory are required weekly. Students are graded, in part, on their command of the oral use of Russian. (1S) Offered each year.

RUSS 110. Intermediate Russian I (1). Review of grammar. Composition and conversation. Rapid reading with oral practice. Readings in modern prose. (1S) Offered each year. Prerequisite: Russian 105 or equivalent.

RUSS 115. Intermediate Russian II (1). Review of grammar. Composition and conversation. Rapid reading with oral practice. Readings in modern prose. (1S) Offered each year. Prerequisite: Russian 110 or equivalent.

RUSS 210. Russian Conversation and Composition I (1). Speaking, reading, and writing Russian with a view to developing fluency in expression. Conducted in Russian. (1S) Offered each fall. Prerequisite: Russian 110 or equivalent.

RUSS 215. Russian Conversation and Composition II (1). Speaking, reading, and writing Russian with a view to further developing fluency in expression. Conducted in Russian. (1S) Offered each spring. Prerequisite: Russian 210 or equivalent.

RUSS 220. Readings in Russian Civilization (1). An examination of significant aspects of past and contemporary Russian society and culture, with an aim of increasing fluency in reading and providing opportunity for hearing and speaking Russian. (5T) Prerequisite: Russian 210 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

RUSS 250. 19th-Century Russian Literature (in translation) (1). An examination of the development of 19th-century Russian literature as it moved away from its adherence to the essentially Western models of the Neo-Classical and Romantic periods toward the so-called “Golden Age” of Russian realism. In the 19th century, Russian literature emerged as an original, independent movement, characterized by profound ethical questioning and moral awareness and concerned with issues of conscience and responsibility. Authors studied include Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov. (5T)

RUSS 255. 20th-Century Russian Literature (in translation) (1). An examination of 20th-century Russian literature both before and after the Revolution. Topics will include the anti-realist trends of the early part of the century, the development of the avant-garde, the effect of revolution and civil war on literature and the arts, the boldly creative NEP period, the invention and implementation of Socialist Realism, problems of censorship and dissent, the “Thaw,” and developments in literature in the post-Stalin years. (5T)

RUSS 260. Topics in Russian Literature (in translation) (.5, 1). Selected topics in 19th- and 20th-century Russian literature. Topics may focus on a single author or novel, on a particular theme, or on a particular period. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. (5T)

RUSS 310. Political Russian (1). This course provides an intensive review of Russian grammar in the context of current events and international relations. Students acquire a strong basis in political vocabulary as they continue to develop the four basic skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Prerequisite: Russian 210 or consent of instructor.

RUSS 315. Understanding Russia: Culture in Everyday Contexts (1). This course is designed to advance students’ understanding of the culture of everyday life in Russia and thus promote the intercultural competency necessary for deep comprehension of Russian texts and for meaningful interactions with Russians in a variety of contexts. Through a close analysis of Viktoria Tokareva’sPervaya Popytka, students learn to decode messages embedded in the novella’s many textual allusions to Russian culture, history, and behavior. By the end of the course, students are able to answer a broad array of questions connected to key aspects of Russian identity; this knowledge, in turn, helps students start communicating across cultural boundaries. Prerequisite: Russian 210 or consent of instructor.

RUSS 360. Selected Topics in Russian Literature (1). A seminar course involving intensive textual analysis in Russian of selected works of 19th- and 20th-century Russian literature. Topics may focus on a single author or novel, or on a particular theme, such as women in Russian literature, literature and revolution, Russian romanticism, the Russian short story. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Prerequisite: Russian 210 or consent of instructor.

RUSS 390. Special Projects (.25 - 1). Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

RUSS 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit.

RUSS 396. Teaching Assistant Research (.5). Course and curriculum development projects with faculty.

Spanish Courses

SPAN 100. Elementary Spanish I (1). Based on a communicative approach, this course provides a solid foundation of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students have daily assignments intended to help them communicate orally and in written form about themselves, friends, and family as well as customs and practices in the Spanish-speaking world in the present, past, and future tenses. Participation in Spanish­language activities outside of the classroom and/or in the local Latino community is expected. (1S) Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of Spanish or consent of instructor. Offered each fall.

SPAN 105. Elementary Spanish II (1). Based on a communicative approach, this course provides a solid foundation of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students have daily assignments intended to help them communicate orally and in written form about themselves, friends, and family as well as customs and practices in the Spanish-speaking world in the present, past, and future tenses. Participation in Spanish­language activities outside of the classroom and/or in the local Latino community is expected. (1S) Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of Spanish or consent of instructor. Offered each spring.

SPAN 107. Spanish for Advanced Beginners (1). Designed for students who have had some formal exposure to Spanish, this course presumes a basic knowledge of Spanish orthography and pronunciation as well as recognition and/or use of elementary everyday vocabulary, the present tense, and grammatical concepts. Students complete daily assignments intended to help them practice vocabulary and develop all four language skills- listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Participation in Spanish- language activities outside the classroom and/or in the local Latino community is expected. (1S) Offered each semester. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (This course is not a continuation of Spanish 100 or 105.)

SPAN 110. Intensive Language Review and Culture (1). Using a content-based approach, this course is organized around a theme or themes determined by the instructor. It offers an intensive review of the fundamentals of Spanish grammar with the goal of increasing vocabulary, grammatical precision and the four linguistic skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish. Readings reflect the many cultures of Spanish-speaking world. Participation in Spanish-language activities outside the classroom and/or in the local Latino community is expected. Taught in Spanish. (1S) Offered each semester. Prerequisite: Spanish 105 or equivalent.

SPAN 210. Advancing Your Speaking (1). By engaging in small and large group discussions and giving presentations based on readings and media, students in this content-based course develop their oral language proficiency. Students increase their vocabulary, review and expand upon grammar, learn linguistic registers with the aim of making them more effective communicators. Participation in Spanish-language activities outside the classroom and/or in the local Latino community is expected. Taught in Spanish. (1S) Offered each semester. Prerequisite: Spanish 110 or equivalent.

SPAN 214. Spanish for Heritage Learners (1). This course is designed for students who grew up speaking Spanish at home but who have little or no formal training in the language. Its aim is to develop a formal command of the language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) while exploring students’ cultural identities and regional variations of Spanish. Fiction and non-fiction, film, music, and other materials are used as a point of departure for discussion, reflection, and writing. Participation in Spanish-language activities and/or in the local Latino community is expected. Taught in Spanish. (1S) Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

SPAN 215. Hispanic Cultures through Writing (1). In this writing intensive content-based course, students focus on the writing process (i.e., prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, rewriting) as they practice various types of writing in Spanish (e.g., summary, description, narration, expository, and persuasive). Students study advanced grammar points and discuss both literary and non-literary texts as a basis for writing. Participation in Spanish-language activities outside the classroom and/or in the local Latino community is expected. Taught in Spanish. (1S) Offered each semester. Prerequisite: Spanish 210, 214, or equivalent.

SPAN 218. Health and Culture in the Spanish-Speaking World (1). In this course, students learn specialized vocabulary needed to discuss and write about health issues in the Spanish-speaking world. This course also emphasizes cultural values, beliefs, and practices required to enhance and develop approaches to health in Spanish-speaking communities. Readings are of a literary and non-literary nature. Participation in Spanish-language activities and/or the local Latino community is expected. Taught in Spanish. (5T) (Also listed as Health and Society 218.) Prerequisite: Spanish 210 or 214

SPAN 230. Coffee and Current Events (1). In this course, over coffee, students discuss current events in the Spanish-speaking world and examine them in light of historical, political, cultural, and/or social developments. By reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing in Spanish on a wide variety of non-literary topics, students are expected to expand their vocabulary, hone their linguistic skills, and deepen their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Participation in Spanish-language activities outside the classroom and/or in the local Latino community is expected. Taught in Spanish. Offered odd years, spring semester. (5T) Prerequisite: Spanish 214 or 215.

SPAN 240. Literary and Cultural Approaches to the Spanish-Speaking World (1). A genre-based approach to reading and writing about the literature and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, this course develops analytical and critical-thinking skills through readings, discussions, and written assignments. Genres may include narrative, poetry, drama, and film and are intended to deepen students' understanding of the human condition. Participation in Spanish-language activities outside the classroom and/or in the local Latino community is expected. Taught in Spanish. (5T) Offered fall semesters. Prerequisite: Spanish 215 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 250: Literary and Non-Literary Translation (1). An introduction to the theories and practice of translation from Spanish to English and English to Spanish, this course familiarizes students with the techniques and processes used to translate different media (e.g., newspapers, magazines, Internet sites) as well as literary texts. In addition to perfecting their linguistic and stylistic expression, students develop writing, editing, and proofreading skills essential for producing clear and polished translations. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 240 or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 270. Introduction to Latino Studies (1). This course examines topics related to the Latina/a experience in the United States. Using films, documentaries, multidisciplinary writings and/or literary pieces, this course may also focus on particular Latino sub-populations in the United States, on identity and ethnicity, immigration, as well as issues relating to language, acculturation/assimilation, gender and sexuality, social movements, and politics. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Taught in English or Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 240 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 282. Environmental Hispanic Literature (1). Using an eco-critical approach, this seminar course involves the study of Spanish-language literatures on themes involving the environment such as preservation, impacts of climate change on communities and peoples, sustainability, rural and urban development, food production, and environmental contamination and its effects. Taught in Spanish. (5T) Prerequisite: Spanish 240.

SPAN 285. Human Rights and Hispanic Cultures (1). In this course, students explore how narratives, memoirs, plays, poetry, and film tell the stories of victims and witnesses of human rights violations in the Spanish-speaking world. While students read about and discuss the historical and political contexts of violations of human rights, they are also expected to consider how writers and filmmakers use language, images, and symbolism to discuss the rights, often abused, of minority groups, indigenous peoples, women, and/or children. The variety of texts and films also serve as a basis for the development of students' reading, critical thinking, and writing skills. Taught in Spanish. (5T) Prerequisite: Spanish 240.

SPAN 290. Selected Topics in 19th-Century Hispanic Literature (1). A seminar course involving intensive textual analysis of 19th-century Spanish literature, Spanish-American literature or both. Topics may cover a single author, work, genre, or a particular theme. May be repeated for credit if topic different. Taught in Spanish. (5T) Prerequisite: Spanish 240.

SPAN 295. Filmic Expressions of the Spanish-Speaking World (1). This course examines Hispanic cultures through films. It may center on films of particular directors, regions, and/or themes to provide cultural appreciation and understanding of the Hispanic world and filmmaking. Taught in Spanish. (5T) Prerequisite: Spanish 240.

SPAN 320. Studies in Hispanic Literature and Culture (1). A course designed to examine in-depth social, cultural, historical and!or literary selected topics particular to the Spanish-speaking world. This course may be taught in English. When taught in English, majors are required to do some or all of the written work in Spanish. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. (5T) Prerequisite: Spanish 240 and one other Spanish literature course.

SPAN 370. Cervantes, Don Quijote, and 17th-Century Cultural Production (1). This seminar course is organized around a close reading of El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha written by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. The class may include works by other Golden-Age authors on occasion. The course takes into consideration the various cultural and political happenings in 17'h-Century Spain, Europe, and the Americas. (5T) Prerequisite: Spanish 240 and one other Spanish course above 240.

SPAN 375. Medieval Literature and Culture (1). This course examines various cultural productions of the Spanish Middle Ages. It includes the study ofliterary, political, artistic, linguistic, scientific, environmental , and/or religious interchanges that existed among the three dominant cultural communities in Spain--Christian, Jewish, and Muslim--and beyond. Students may be asked to discuss themes such as love, death, power, betrayal, religion, exile, migration, nationalism, and warfare along with the literary and artistic representation of national heroes and anti-heroes, kings, queens, rogues, mystics, knights, saints, and witches. (5T) Prerequisite: Spanish 240 and one other Spanish course above 240.

SPAN 390. Special Projects (.25 - 1). Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

SPAN 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit.

SPAN 396. Teaching Assistant Research (.5). Course and curriculum development projects with faculty.