Education

Ph.D., University of Chicago

B.A., Washington University in St. Louis

Courses Taught

American Horrors in Film and Literature

Introduction to Literary Study: Intimacy

Research Interests

20th and 21st century American literature; critical race theory; gender and sexuality studies; aesthetics

Publications

  • “Filter Style.”  New Literary History (forthcoming)
  • “Minimalism as Detoxification.” Modern Fiction Studies (forthcoming)
  • “Leaks: A Genre.” Post45 (2017)

  • “Camp’s Distribution: ‘Our’ Aesthetic Category.” Social Text 35.2 (2017): 39–67

  • “Representation Between Utilitarianism & Liberalism: Focalization in Phineas Finn.” Novel 50.2 (2017): 236–254.
  • “2017, The Year in Horror.” Los Angeles Review of Books

Michael Dango


Assistant Professor of English


  dangomt@beloit.edu   Room 112, World Affairs Center (WAC)
  • Michael Dango
    ©2018 photo by John Zich

I research and teach twentieth and twenty-first century American culture, aesthetics, queer and feminist theory, and the environmental humanities. Prior to joining Beloit, I was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Chicago, where I also completed by Ph.D. in English literature. 

In my classes, we look at contemporary art, media, and literature to see how people are developing frameworks for making sense of urgent political, social, and environmental questions.  We explore how poetry might develop new forms of intimacy and kinship, how horror films intervene into structures of racial and sexual violence, and how politics becomes fiction and fiction becomes politics.

I am currently at work on two book-length projects. The first, Styles of Repair, theorizes how stylistic developments in contemporary fiction, sculpture, film, and design respond to a sense of pervasive crisis. I look at how artists use style as a way to repair environmental degradation and political stress. The second, Bad Sex: An Aesthetic Problem, argues we should replace our legalistic vocabulary for sex and sexual harm with an aesthetic one. I consider a long history of aesthetic theory’s entanglement with the sexual, as well as the pressure (bad) sex puts on aesthetic form.  My writings have appeared or are forthcoming in New Literary History, Modern Fiction Studies, Post45, Social Text, Novel, Critical Inquiry, Modern Philology, New Inquiry, and The Los Angeles Review of Books.

 

You can learn more about my writing and teaching at my personal website: https://www.michaeldango.com/.

Edit my profile

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read our Web Privacy Policy for more information.

Got it! ×