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Students

The Learning Enrichment and Disability Services Office, working in conjunction with faculty, staff and student paraprofessionals, assists students in being successful with the challenges of college.

Things for Prospective/Incoming Students To Think About:

One-on-One Assistance

The Learning Enrichment and Disability Services Office has a full-time professional staff member and Learning Assistants (trained peers) who meet with students to improve their academic performance. During these sessions, they get to know the students, their preferences, strengths and weaknesses, and then offer suggestions. They can address a variety of concerns such as managing time, learning test-taking strategies, handling test anxiety, taking improved notes or increasing motivation to study. They don't promise magical transformations, but do their best to assist students in improving their performance.

Academic Enrichment Activities

Learning Enrichment and Disability Services provides a variety of activities throughout the year that cover a range of relevant topic such as time management, note-taking, de-procrastination, and test-taking strategies. These activities come in a variety of forms such as workshops, presentations, drop-in sessions, interactive opportunities, podcasts, and tabling.  At times, activities are provided for particular groups such as First-Year Initiatives (FYI) seminars, athletes, Greek houses, residence hall floors, and clubs or organizations. All students are welcome to attend the sessions.  

Free Tutoring Program

One avenue of getting additional assistance in a particular course is to work with a tutor. Tutoring is FREE to all students currently enrolled at Beloit College. The Learning Enrichment and Disability Services Office hires and trains students who have been recommended by professors to provide tutoring assistance. Typically this tutoring is done in small groups of two.

The process is simple: If a student wants a tutor,  the student goes to your Portal, After you log in, you will see several tabs, click on  "Student Life". On the left hand side you will see "Tutoring Forms".  Select "Tutoring Request Form" and complete.  Be sure you click "Submit Form" at the end. If you are requesting a tutor for more than one course, you will need to complete a separate request for each class. You will be contacted via email when you have been matched with a tutor.  The tutor and tutees can then meet regularly (up to 2 hours per week) to improve students' knowledge of the subject. The tutor may also work with tutees on their general study skills and strategies, if time permits.

Tutoring is available for most courses, but is not guaranteed. Fortunately, the professors of Beloit College are willing to assist students and many times also have Teaching Assistants (TAs), students that have done well in the course in the past and provide study sessions and/or classroom assistance to students. As you can see, there are many avenues for reaching academic goals available at Beloit College.

Would you like your student to get a job to help fund their education?

For students who are particularly knowledgeable in a course or talented in a particular subject area, they can become a tutor. This office typically hires over 50 tutors per semester. Students can work to a maximum of 10 hours per week at $7.50 per hour (2014-2015). The hours are flexible and the tutors provide an invaluable resource on campus. For other possible positions on campus, students can contact the Student Employment Web Site

Being Ready For College

Oftentimes students will be given information on "What to bring for your residence hall room" (Residence Life), but sometimes the information lacks the details of what to have to be organized and ready for the academic challenges. Please take a look at this list and make sure that you either acquire the necessary supplies before coming to Beloit College or acquire them soon after moving in (before classes begin).

  • Calendar/organizer/planner (such as an Beloit College Academic Planner)
  • Dictionary
  • Envelopes (stamps available in the mail center)
  • File folders
  • Glue/paste
  • Highlighters
  • Notebooks
  • Paper clips
  • Pens/Pencils
  • Ruler
  • Scissors
  • Stapler/staples/staple remover
  • Sticky Notes
  • Rubber bands
  • Tape and tape dispenser
  • Thesaurus

If you have a printer, do not forget paper and ink/toner. Otherwise, printing is available on campus, such as in the campus library.

Getting Organized

It takes a lot of organizational skills to keep track of all of the information and paperwork necessary to apply to and enroll in a college or university. The Learning Enrichment and Disability Services Office recommends that for each College you are considering, have a folder for each of these areas and make copies of everything that you have sent in with notations on when you sent it and to whom you sent it:

  • Application/Transcripts/SAT or ACT score
  • Disability documentation
  • Employment forms, work-study, job history (resume)
  • Financial Aid
  • Health Services
  • Housing
  • Orientation/FYI information
  • Registration, advising information
  • Other Questions
    • "How do I get involved in a particular club/organization?"
    • "How do I get vegetarian meals?"
    • "Who do I talk about being on the soccer team?"
    • etc.

If your information is in some order, then you won't need to panic when you find out that someone claims to not have the information that you sent him or her. You can simply look it up, explain to whom you sent it and when, and if necessary, copy and resend the information. Learning how to be organized is a necessary skill for learning how to be a good student. Start now!

Graduate School Entrance Examination Preparation

Interested in going to graduate or professional (e.g. Law, Medical) school after you graduate? Most graduate and professional schools require an examination (much like the SAT or ACT for undergraduate colleges) as part of the application process. The Learning Enrichment and Disability Services Office assists students in preparing for such examinations. You usually need to take the exam early in your Senior year. Come to see us during your Junior year so that you have time to prepare. Stop by and see what we have and what we can do.  Each semester we try to put together a panel of people (usually students) who have recently taken the exams.  If interested in attending this event, contact our office for specifics.

You also need to discuss your interest in graduate/professional school with your advisor. In addition, you would benefit from working with the Career Development Office.

We also have limited resources for students interested in the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST).