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LAPC Course and Classroom Offerings


Career Development Modules for FYI Classes

From "Building Your Liberal Arts in Practice Network", to "Documenting Your Professional Life Story," Career Development and Field Experience Grant Program staff offer five workshops designed to help students within FYI classes to begin their Liberal Arts in Practice experience at Beloit with reflective action. An overview of workshop offerings is available here.

Faculty who are interested in incorporating one or more Career Development Workshops into their capstone should contact Director Jessica Fox-Wilson at foxjs@beloit.edu.


Career Development Workshops for Capstones

From "Assessing One's Self Critically", to examining "Workplaces as Cultures", the Career Development staff offer nine workshops designed to help students within capstones to transfer their knowledge and experience to their lives beyond Beloit.  An overview of workshop offerings is available here.

Faculty who are interested in incorporating one or more Career Development Workshops into their capstone should contact Director Jessica Fox-Wilson at foxjs@beloit.edu.


The First Year Exploratory Program

The First Year Exploratory Program helps students obtain placement in a summer learning opportunity such as an internship, or an independent project.

To be eligible for this .5 credit program you must be a full time student at Beloit and be a first generation and low income student, or an underrepresented minority. You must also possess at least a 2.75 GPA and be interested in attending graduate school. (Please note: After application is submitted our office will request your first semester transcript.) For more information, please visit the First Year Exploratory Program page.


FEP 200 Internship (.25-1.00)

In FEP 200 students engage in a paired internship-Special Project experience which, if taken for a full unit of credit, fulfills the Liberal Arts in Practice requirement (LAP-1). Students may enroll in the internship after locating their own internship and securing a faculty sponsor. The faculty sponsor will oversee the development of the content and form of the academic reflection, as well as provide assessment of whether the work merits the credit requested. A full unit of internship credit assumes between 90 and 150 hours, depending on requirements as negotiated between the student and the faculty sponsor. Graded credit/no credit.

The FEP 200 Internship Form can be found here and on the LAPC Forms and Resources site.


FEP 201.01 Internship Workshop

In this half credit course, students engage in a paired internship-workshop experience, which fulfills the Liberal Arts in Practice requirement (LAP-2). Students may enroll in the workshop after sourcing their own internship, with approval from the Liberal Arts in Practice professional staff. The course begins with a pre-internship orientation and readings, which focus on reflective practice, professionalism, and workplace communication. Students also craft four to five learning objectives prior to starting the internship, with guidance from the Liberal Arts in Practice Center professional staff. Following the internship, students record and reflect on their experience and its connection to their undergraduate education and their future careers, through group discussion and a reflective essay. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor, and completion of Internship Workshop Registration form.

The FEP 201 Internship can be found here or at the LAPC Forms and Resources page.


FEP 201.02 Internship Workshop - Paraprofessional Work-Study

In this half credit L2 course students engage in their workstudy as an internship experience. The course engages students in an active negotiation with their labor — as a philosophical problem, a series of discreet skills-based practices and social acquisitions, and a vehicle for a lifetime of active engagement in the liberal arts. The course begins with a pre-internship orientation and readings which focus on reflective practice, professionalism, and workplace communication. Students also craft four to five learning objectives prior to starting the internship with guidance by LAPC Faculty. There is one off-site field visit required (with several options for fulfillment). Following the internship, students record and reflect on their experience and its connection to their undergraduate education and their future careers, through group discussion and a reflective essay.

FEP 285. Entrepreneurship Practicum

Qualifying students may have the option to earn academic credit for their self-designed entrepreneurial ventures. Students must plan their project, its goals and expectations, in consultation with the CELEB director, who must grant approval to the project and specify the appropriate academic credit. Upon approval, the student may enroll. Students participate in regular, weekly group discussion/advising with the CELEB director together with others also engaged in such ventures. Students pursue and complete their projects under advisement of the director and submit adequate documentation of the experience at its end to the director. Expected time commitment for 1 unit of credit is participation in group meetings plus approximately 90 project hours per term, and .5 unit is participation in group meetings plus approximately 45 project hours per term. Graded Credit/No Credit. Offered every spring.

MUSI 250. Selected Topics in Sound Studies - Interactive Media

Interactive Media combines the study of audio recording and editing with video recording and editing. The one credit course deals with the replacement of audio from video recordings using techniques of foleying (sound effects) and voice-overs. Students will be given a prepared script that they must storyboard and plan previous to the shoot. Consideration must be given to the quality of sound--whether to use the microphone on the camera and do voice-overs afterwards or to do high quality audio with outboard microphones and only do spot voice-overs. Additionally, foleying after the video shoot is a quintessential part of the final product. Experts in the field of audio and video will be invited to speak to the class. No prerequisites. Sophomore standing preferred or by consent of instructor.

SOCI 285. Duffy Community Partnerships Seminar

Through hands-on engagement and academic reflection, this one credit course acquaints students with various, basic sociological tools for understanding institutions and communities such as: demographic data, ethnographic analysis, historical and political sociology. The overarching question addressed by this course is: “What makes a good society?” Students will experience, describe, and analyze the challenges of civic engagement, service, and leadership. Each student will spend approximately seven hours a week (90 hours per semester) at an assigned field site supervised by experienced community leaders. In addition, all will attend a weekly seminar with reading and writing assignments focusing on texts examining communities from various sociological and interdisciplinary angles. Sites include: business, education, government, health care, social services, and the arts. Students from all majors are welcome.

IDST 202. Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This one credit course focuses on the entrepreneurial process and its component parts. Through case studies, students will explore the elements and skills required for successful venturing such as financing, planning, marketing, and negotiating. Course will focus on pragmatism and developing sound judgment within the context of ambiguous scenarios.

WRIT 200 Grant Writing

This upper-division writing practicum provides students with the opportunity to engage in hands on training in the field of non-profit development while finessing their professional writing and research skills. Assigned to work with a non-profit through the duration of the course, a student’s typical writing and research activities include developing a boilerplate organizational narrative, drafting a program logic model, and theory of change, conducting prospect research, drafting a cover letter and program budget, and developing three proposals, each with a unique limitation and rhetorical challenge (such as operational funds, project funding, and online application with limited character counts). Prerequisite: Must be working or volunteering with a non-profit through the course of the semester, or be willing to be partnered with one through the duration of the course. (May be cross listed as IDST 210.)