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English Courses

Course information found here includes all permanent offerings and is updated regularly whenever Academic Senate approves changes. For historical information, see the Course Catalogs. For actual course availability in any given term, use Course Search in the Portal.

ENGL 190. Introduction to Literary Study (1). Designed for the potential major in English and other interested students. Prerequisite to advanced courses in English. These courses introduce students to the close reading of selected poetry, drama, and prose, with training in analysis and critical writing. (Also listed as Comparative Literature 190. English majors should register for English 190.) (5T) Offered each semester.

ENGL 195. British Literary Traditions (1). Introduces students to British and English-language texts from the earliest literary period to the most recent, with emphasis on broad historical patterns of literary and cultural influence. Each course examines the formation and transformation of literary canons, national traditions, and evolving concepts of artistic value and creativity. As a reading-intensive study of literary texts and their specific historical contexts, this course is appropriate for the general student and also provides groundwork crucial for more advanced English classes. Offered each semester. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190.

ENGL 196. American Literary Traditions (1). Introduces students to American texts from the 17th century to the most recent literary periods, with emphasis on broad historical patterns of literary and cultural influence. Each course examines the formation and transformation of literary canons, national traditions, and evolving concepts of artistic value and creativity. As a reading-intensive study of literary texts and their specific historical contexts, this course is appropriate for the general student and also provides groundwork crucial for more advanced English classes. Offered each semester. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190.

ENGL 205. Introduction to Creative Writing (1). Experimentation and practice in writing poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Readings to suggest and illustrate forms and techniques. (2A) Offered each semester. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190.

ENGL 210. Creative Writing: Poetry (1). Analysis of representative poems to increase understanding and appreciation of the nature, styles, and methods of poetry. Composition and discussion of original poems in various forms. Offered each fall. Prerequisite: English 205 and junior standing

ENGL 215. Writing for Performance (1). Analysis of and practice in writing for live and/or mediated performance, such as for stage, film, or digital storytelling. Offered even years, spring semester. (Also listed as Theatre Arts, Dance and Media Studies 233.) Prerequisite: English 205 or Theatre Arts, Dance and Media Studies 202, and junior standing

ENGL 220. Creative Writing: Fiction (1). Study and practice of the techniques of short story writing to increase understanding and appreciation of the nature, styles, and methods of fiction. Includes analysis of representative examples and practice in writing fiction of various lengths. Offered each fall. Prerequisite: English 205 and junior standing

ENGL 223. Topics in Creative Writing (1). This course examines specific modes of creative writing that cross traditional literary genres. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Offered each spring. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 205 and junior standing

ENGL 226. Creative Non-Fiction (1). Study and practice in the essay as a literary form. Some historical survey of the personal essay in the English-speaking world, especially in Britain and America. Special attention to what makes essays “literary,” and practice in writing such essays. Offered each spring. Prerequisite: English 205 and junior standing

ENGL 227. The Mackey Workshop (.5). Advanced practice in poetry-writing, fiction-writing, play-writing, or essay-writing. Genre varies with the particular instructor, who will always be the Lois and Willard Mackey Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ENGL 228. Practicum in Literary Editing: Beloit Fiction Journal (1). This course is an editing workshop aimed at selecting manuscripts for publication in the Beloit Fiction Journal, an established national literary magazine. Students will read and critically assess unpublished manuscripts submitted by writers from all over the world. They will also participate in various facets of literary magazine production. (Also listed as Journalism 228. English majors should register for English 228.) Offered each fall. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

ENGL 251. Studies in Medieval Literature (1). Literature before 1500, first of a set of courses, “Texts and Historical Contexts,” all of which approach literature by locating it in its historical context. Recent topics have included Chaucer and His Contemporaries. Offered every other year. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190; additional prerequisites vary with instructor.

ENGL 252. Studies in Renaissance Literature (1). Literature 1500 to mid-1600s, second of a set of courses, “Texts and Historical Contexts,” all of which approach literature by locating it in its historical context. Recent topics have included Shakespeare and Film; Milton and Satanic Rebellion. (Also listed as Theatre Arts, Dance and Media Studies 252, when appropriate.) Offered every year. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190; additional prerequisites vary with instructor.

ENGL 253. Studies in Restoration and Enlightenment Literature (1). Literature mid-1600s to late 1700s, third of a set of courses, “Texts and Historical Contexts,” all of which approach literature by locating it in its historical context. Recent topics have included Discipline and Desire: The Politics of Space in British Writing of the 1700s. Offered every other year. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190; additional prerequisites vary with instructor.

ENGL 254. Studies in Romantic Literature (1). Literature late 1700s through early 1800s, fourth of a set of courses, “Texts and Historical Contexts,” all of which approach literature by locating it in its historical context. Recent topics have included Romantic Poetry, Philosophy, and Rebellion. Offered every other year. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190; additional prerequisites vary with instructor.

ENGL 256. Studies in American Literature Before 1860 (1). American literature to 1860, fifth of a set of courses, “Texts and Historical Contexts,” all of which approach literature by locating it in its historical context. Recent topics have included Poe and Hawthorne; The Emergence of the American Novel; Sex, Salvation, and Adventure. Offered every year. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190; additional prerequisites vary with instructor.

ENGL 257. Studies in Literature, Later 1800s and Early 1900s (1). Sixth of a set of courses, “Texts and Historical Contexts,” all of which approach literature by locating it in its historical context. Recent topics have included Gender and the Victorian Novel; Modernity and Melancholia. Offered every other year. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190; additional prerequisites vary with instructor.

ENGL 258. Studies in Literature, 20th Century and Beyond (1). Seventh of a set of courses, “Texts and Historical Contexts,” all of which approach literature by locating it in its historical context. Recent topics have included the Harlem Renaissance, Sunset on the British Empire, African American Women Writers, and 9-11 Fiction. Offered every year. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190; additional prerequisites vary with instructor.

ENGL 261. Literary and Cultural Theory (1). This course studies the processes of representation and interpretation, examining the nature and working of language, texts, and reading. It introduces various critical ideas and approaches, engaging both the contemporary field and its antecedents, and it integrates theory and practice, testing the usefulness of theoretical insights through the actual reading of literary and cultural texts. (Also listed as Comparative Literature 261.) Offered every spring. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190, and English 195 or 196, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 262. Genre, Mode, Technique (1). These courses focus on a genre, mode, or technique, examining it across different periods, cultures, and/or media. Whatever their subject, these courses define it, trace its development, and locate its uses in relation to specific contexts and purposes. Courses of this kind might engage, for example: science or detective fiction, confessional poetry, myth, the Gothic, irony, or first-person narration. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Offered every year. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190; additional prerequisites vary with instructor.

ENGL 263. Colonial/Postcolonial Literatures in English (1). These courses focus on literature written in English through the lens of the imperial/colonial experience. Writers may belong to previously colonized nations, or may be members of diasporic or marginalized communities. Works are contextualized theoretically as well as in relation to specific international, cultural, and/or historical regions. (Also listed as TDMS 234 Post Colonial Drama, when appropriate.) May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Offered odd years, spring semester. Topics course. Prerequisite: varies with instructor.

ENGL 264. Topics in Media and Cultural Analysis (1). These courses focus on media and other facets of popular culture, examining specific texts and artifacts. They may employ rhetorical and discursive analysis, historical study, cultural theory, or comparative approaches. Topics may include print media, digital media and culture, film, television, stage, history of the book, or the graphic novel. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Offered every other year. Prerequisite: English 190, Comparative Literature 190, Journalism 125, or Theatre, Dance and Media Studies 202, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 266. Aesthetics and Theories of Composition (.25 - 1). This course focuses on theories of writing and aesthetic approaches involved in the composition of literary texts. Genre, historical period(s), and course emphasis will vary with section and instructor. Sample topics include the theory of the novel, memory and the modern memoir, and aesthetic approaches to poetry and drama. Offered occasionally. Topics course. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 271. Topics in Literature and Criticism (1). Attention to special problems in literature and/or criticism. Complementing other offerings, these courses vary in subject and approach. They arise from and respond to the particular interests and expertise of students and faculty. Prerequisite: varies with instructor.

ENGL 290. Independent Study (.25, .5, or 1). Individually planned programs of reading, writing, research, and consultation supervised by a member of the department. No more than 1 unit of standard independent study credit or special project credit may be applied toward any major. Prerequisite: English 190 or Comparative Literature 190, sophomore standing, and consent of instructor.

ENGL 301. Literature in Context (1). These advanced seminars examine literature in ideological, artistic, historical, and/or rhetorical contexts. Courses address culminating problems or topics, require sustained individual projects, and/or explore practical questions and applications arising from literary studies and creative writing. May be repeated for credit if topic is different. Offered each semester. Topics course. (CP) Prerequisite: junior standing, English 190 or Comparative Literature 190, and English 195 or 196; or consent of instructor.

ENGL 310. Literature as Process: Composing in Forms (1). These advanced seminars examine specialized literary forms, studying texts that define the history and development of literary genres and/or questions (historical fiction, the long poem, sequential fiction, travel writing, etc.). Students are expected to produce original creative works within each category included in the course. Recommended for creative-writing majors or literary-studies majors with interests in particular types of genre writing. May be repeated for credit if content changes. (CP) Offered every other semester. Topics course. Prerequisite: junior standing, and English 190 or Comparative Literature 190. and English 195 or 196; or consent of instructor.

ENGL 390. Special Projects (.5, 1). Individually planned programs of reading, writing, research, and consultation supervised by a member of the department. No more than 1 unit of standard special projects credit may be applied toward any major. Prerequisite: junior standing, and English 190 or Comparative Literature 190, and English 195 or 196 for literature projects; English 205 plus appropriate genre course for creative-writing projects.

ENGL 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit.