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Education & Youth Studies Courses

Course information found here includes all permanent offerings and is updated regularly whenever Academic Senate approves changes. For historical information, see the Course Catalogs. For actual course availability in any given term, use Course Search in the Portal.

  • EDYS 102. Historical and Philosophical Perspectives in Education and Youth Studies (1). An exploration of a variety of philosophical and historical approaches to the study of education and youth. Students’ own educational experiences, in school and out of school, as well as their developmental histories and personal philosophies, are considered in their relation to each other, as sources of knowledge and understanding. Students read (and write about) philosophers and theorists from a broad range of traditions, periods, and places. Integrated with philosophical explorations, students undertake historical investigations of schooling youth; this course focuses on the history of the U.S. and the development of ideas of democratic schooling in contexts of inequality. In their writing and face-to-face interactions, students are strongly encouraged to employ philosophical and historical methodologies for their own self-expression. (5T) Offered each fall and alternate spring semesters.

  • EDYS 151. Psychological Perspectives in Education and Youth Studies (1). An exploration of learning, motivation, and creativity across the lifespan, with a focus on childhood and adolescence. Students are exposed to a variety of psychological frameworks on the lives of youth and adults across many settings; including school, family, community, peer group, work settings, mental health and correctional institutions, etc. Students learn to understand the evidence-based methodologies, quantitative and qualitative, used by psychologists, and are encouraged to use these methods in their own analyses. We employ alternative/artistic forms of representation such as music, creative writing, and audio and video, to explore and represent their own psychological experience. Students are responsible for collaboratively generating alternative assessment strategies that combine critical thinking and creative expression. (3B) Offered each fall and alternate spring terms.

  • EDYS 164. Socio-Cultural Perspectives in Education and Youth Studies (1). An exploration of major theories and significant research on the development and explanation of social and cultural differences and how they affect the lives and education of youth. The course will investigate student diversity, with special attention to race, class, gender, language, and the inclusion of students with special needs in general education. Issues are examined mainly through the lenses of sociology, anthropology, and education and youth policy. Using the theories and methodologies of these disciplines, students will critically examine how and why race, class, language, ability and disability, and gender have influenced education. (3B) (Also listed as Critical Identity Studies 204) Offered each spring and alternate fall semesters.

  • EDYS 201. Comparative and International Perspectives in Education and Youth Studies (1). In this seminar, we explore comparative and international perspectives on education and youth studies by focusing on readings that primarily address comparative methodology, including the questions, what is a case and what is a case for. A prominent theme in our reading is globalization, what it means and how it influences our intellectual and social landscapes, our teaching and research approaches, how we borrow and lend educational ideas, and the way we are connected to each other. We explore comparative methodology primarily by reading and evaluating case study monographs. The monographs we read have been chosen to represent: 1) different methodologies and interpretations of what “case studies” are; 2) different “genres” of comparative education; and 3) different approaches to how particular kinds of comparative literature might shape public policy as well as our teaching and learning. Through a close examination of comparative methodologies and reading of case studies from different cultures and societies, students learn to position domestic issues on youth and education in the global context. Our class is largely discussion based with class participants responsible for guiding our analyses of case studies and comparative methodology – in part by sharing weekly reading response and through group presentation projects. (3B) Offered each fall. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

  • EDYS 246. Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language (1). This course is designed for students who are interested in teaching English as a second or foreign language (ESL/EFL). It includes foundational information on the theories, contexts, and methodology of language acquisition, as well as an overview of current socio-political issues related to teaching English abroad. Students will examine, discuss, and apply aspects of the following topics: intercultural communication, curriculum development and lesson planning, skill-based methodology, language assessment, materials critiques, computer/ technology-aided learning, resource development, classroom research, and socio-cultural theory. Field experience, classroom observations, and practice teaching are included. Offered each spring.

  • EDYS 252. Quantitative Reasoning and Numeracy (1). This course is a theoretical and practical investigation into the use of mathematics, and the development of mathematical knowledge and skill, focused on children and youth in both school and informal settings. Students in this course learn about the development of quantitative thinking; cognitive processes underlying literacy and language; pedagogies of mathematics; data and statistics; and the roles of technology in quantitative contexts. The course includes attention to pupils with diverse social, intellectual, emotional, and physical abilities, as well as different levels of opportunity to learn. Students observe students at different ages engaged in a variety of mathematical activities, and undertake an independent participant/observation research project in a relevant setting of their choice. (L2) Offered each spring. Prerequisite: two 100-level Education and Youth Studies course.

  • EDYS 260. Museum Education and Informal Learning (1). See Museum Studies 260 for description.

  • EDYS 262. Literacy, Language, and Literature (1). This course is a theoretical and practical investigation into language arts conceived broadly, focused on children and youth in both school and informal settings. Students learn about language and literacy acquisition; sociolinguistics; cognitive/neuropsychological processes underlying literacy and language; reading and writing pedagogies; and the experience of engagement with literature. The course includes attention to readers, writers, and speakers with diverse social, intellectual, emotional, and physical abilities, as well as different levels of opportunity to learn. Students observe students at different ages engaged in a variety of mathematical activities, and undertake an independent participant/observation research project in a relevant setting of their choice. (L2) Offered each spring. Prerequisite: two 100-level Education and Youth Studies course.

  • EDYS 276. Advanced Topics in Education and Youth Studies (1). Courses offered under this rubric address a wide range of questions central to education and youth studies, from different disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. Pedagogical approaches also vary according to instructor and topic. Recent offerings, for example, have focused on East Asian education, youth involvement in U.S. labor history, racial dynamics of Romani education, gender and education, environmental justice, mindfulness and adolescent development, African coming-of-age literature, et al. Nearly all offerings under this rubric are explicitly oriented toward the understanding of issues of inequality, injustice, and critical difference. Each offering of the course provides an introduction to, and practical experience with, the methodologies of inquiry specific to the discipline/topic under study. May be taken for credit more than once, with different topics. Offered three times each year. Prerequisite: varies by topic.

  • EDYS 300. Practicum in Teaching (1). Students participate in pre-K to high school classrooms as teaching apprentices, in conjunction with an ongoing workshop devoted to learning about planning, instruction, and assessment. One unit requires a minimum of eight hours weekly in a classroom setting—a total of approximately 120 hours—with the goal of high-quality independent teaching, under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. All practica take place in local schools that feature significant socio-cultural diversity, and offer experience working with a wide range of atypical students in mainstream and special settings. Students are placed in classrooms corresponding to eventual teaching interests, leading in most cases to students teaching. Students aspiring to obtain certification should undertake teaching experiences with children/youth at two different levels of schooling, e.g. high school and middle school. The goal of the workshop will be the completion of a short version of the Educational Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA), the equivalent to a field-based research project, requiring a written report of approximately 25 pages. Students may take this course twice, with different placements. (L1) Offered each semester. Prerequisite: junior status, and Education and Youth Studies 252 and/or 262.

  • EDYS 302. Student Teaching in Elementary School (1 - 3). Students will participate in an eighteen week, full-time teaching experience in an elementary school with responsibilities for lesson planning, teaching, and evaluation, in addition to parent-teacher conferences, department meetings, and extracurricular activities. A cooperating teacher in students’ respective disciplines and a Beloit College supervisor will mentor students to help develop professional teaching habits and evaluate student teaching progress. Students will meet as a group at least once monthly on campus to discuss teaching experiences, and to work on edTPA (Teacher Performance Assessment). Successful submission of edTPA, as well as passing scores on other tests required by the Department of Public Instruction, are required for certification in Wisconsin. Students may complete student teaching locally or petition to teach elsewhere. (L1) Prerequisite: senior of 9th-term status; Education and youth Studies major completed or in progress; grades of B or better in Education and Youth Studies 252, 262, and two units of 300; and consent of department. Course fee of $350 for official edTPA scoring. Additional fees for supervision when students teaching outside of local area.

  • EDYS 303. Student Teaching in Middle School (1 - 3). Students will participate in an eighteen week, full-time teaching experience in a middle or intermediate school with responsibilities for lesson planning, teaching, and evaluation, in addition to parent-teacher conferences, department meetings, and extracurricular activities. A cooperating teacher in students’ respective disciplines and a Beloit College supervisor will mentor students to help develop professional teaching habits and evaluate student teaching progress. Students will meet as a group at least once monthly on campus to discuss teaching experiences, and to work on edTPA (Teacher Performance Assessment). Successful submission of edTPA, as well as passing scores on other tests required by the Department of Public Instruction, are required for certification in Wisconsin. Students may complete student teaching locally or petition to teach elsewhere. (L1) Prerequisite: senior of 9th-term status; Education and youth Studies major completed or in progress; grades of B or better in Education and Youth Studies 252, 262, and two units of 300; and consent of department. Course fee of $350 for official edTPA scoring. Additional fees for supervision when students teaching outside of local area.

  • EDYS 304. Student Teaching in High School (1 - 3). Students will participate in an eighteen week, full-time teaching experience in a high school with responsibilities for lesson planning, teaching, and evaluation, in addition to parent-teacher conferences, department meetings, and extracurricular activities. A cooperating teacher in students’ respective disciplines and a Beloit College supervisor will mentor students to help develop professional teaching habits and evaluate student teaching progress. Students will meet as a group at least once monthly on campus to discuss teaching experiences, and to work on edTPA (Teacher Performance Assessment). Successful submission of edTPA, as well as passing scores on other tests required by the Department of Public Instruction, are required for certification in Wisconsin. Students may complete student teaching locally or petition to teach elsewhere. (L1) Prerequisite: senior of 9th-term status; Education and youth Studies major completed or in progress; grades of B or better in Education and Youth Studies 252, 262, and two units of 300; and consent of department. Course fee of $350 for official edTPA scoring. Additional fees for supervision when students teaching outside of local area.

  • EDYS 306. Field Research in Education and Youth Studies (.5 - 3). The purpose of this course is to develop understanding and practical expertise in qualitative inquiry into a broad range of contemporary issues in education and youth studies. Students develop proposals for field-based research; learn about the relevant methods of inquiry for their chosen topics and settings; undertake supervised research in local settings; and write a final report of their experience/findings. In regular meetings of the entire class, small-scale group research projects are developed and executed, individual research proposals are presented and critiqued, and methods of inquiry are studied. Students are strongly encouraged to develop research projects that feature exploration of social justice issues, and to seek commensurate field placements. Students also work collaborately on the composition of their written research reports. The class also includes a more individualized component, in which students work with the instructor and their field supervisor to carry out their own research projects. (L1) Offered each semester. Prerequisite: junior standing and at least one unit of Education and Youth Studies 276.

  • EDYS 382. Capstone Seminar (1). Seniors reflect together with the instructor on issues in education and youth studies encountered over their undergraduate career. The class undertakes the joint study of a topic of common interest, producing a volume of writing that represents each student’s contribution to this study. Students also discuss post-graduate plans and opportunities. Individually, students synthesize in writing, and by other means, the portfolio they have assembled in their courses, along with recollections and records of related experiences, i.e. off-campus study and internships. Students are responsible for the completion of a substantive capstone project that represents, in most cases, their teaching experiences and/or research in Education and Youth Studies 300 and 306, respectively. All students present some version of their capstone projects publicly: in a college symposium, in departmental symposia, in another Education and Youth Studies course, or off-campus, in a school or agency, for example. (CP) Offered each semester. Prerequisite: senior standing, Education and Youth Studies major or minor, Education and Youth Studies 300 or 306.

  • EDYS 383. Honors Thesis (.5). Students eligible for department honors (criteria available on Education and Youth Studies webpage) work individually with a faculty mentor to complete a written thesis of not less than 8,000 words, approximating the style and substance required for publication in a peer-reviewed journal appropriate to the subject of the student’s research. Offered each semester. Prerequisite: senior standing and recommendation of the department.

  • EDYS 390. Special Projects (.25 - 1). Individual research work to further specific student interest/expertise, under faculty supervision. Research may entail reading and writing, field or other kind of empirical research, skill-building, practical pursuits (building a website or organizing an off-campus event, for example), or (preferably) some combination of above. Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies major or minor, sophomore standing.

  • EDYS 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty member in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

  • EDYS 396. Teaching Assistant Research (.5). Course and curriculum development projects with faculty member(s). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

  • EDYS 397. Research Assistant (.5). Assistance to an education and youth studies faculty member in scholarly research. Prerequisite: education and youth studies major. Departmental approval.