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Education & Youth Studies Courses

Course information found here includes all permanent offerings and is updated regularly whenever Academic Senate approves changes. For historical information, see the Course Catalogs. For actual course availability in any given term, use Course Search in the Portal.

EDYS 101. Education in a Democratic Society (1). This course examines the role of education in a democratic society. Students are introduced to the historical, philosophical, social, and political principles and issues of schooling in a democracy. Four interrelated themes of freedom, equity, community, and responsibility provide a conceptual framework and foundation for future study in education. Includes 10 hours of field experience. (3B) Offered at least once per year.

EDYS 102. Alternative Education Perspectives (1). An introduction to a variety of educational perspectives, using principles of philosophical, historical, social, and political thought, to study the purpose(s) of education. Personal experiences with American education will be critiqued for specific assumptions and put into a wider context of circumstances and perspectives that lead to questions of world citizenship. Topics may include international education (with an emphasis on a particular region), indigenous education, history of African American education, alternative schools, education for gifted and talented students, religious education institutions, schools for disabilities, and home schooling. As part of the course, students will visit at least four different education sites. Includes at least 15 hours of field experience. (3B) Offered at least once per year.

EDYS 151. Learning, Motivation, and Development (1). This course introduces the study of learning, motivation, and creativity from early childhood through adolescence. Students explore diverse psychological perspectives on the lives of youth in different settings: including school, family, community, peer group, mental health and correctional institutions, etc. Informed by these investigations, students engage in arts-based explorations of youth, employing creative writing, dramatic performance, dance, cinematography, and other visual arts. Students collaboratively generate alternate assessment strategies that combine critical thinking and creative expression. (2A) Offered every fall and alternate spring terms.

EDYS 164. Constructing Difference: Diversity and Education (1). This course explores major theories and significant research on the development and explanation of individual differences and how those differences affect the education of youth. The course will explore issues of student diversity, with special attention to race, class, gender, language, and the inclusion of students with special and exceptional needs in general education. Issues are examined mainly through the lenses of history, sociology, economics, and education and youth policy. Students will critically examine how and why race, class, language, ability and disability, and gender have influenced education. Includes at least 15 hours of field experience. (3B) Offered every spring and alternate fall terms. (Also listed as Critical Identity Studies 204.)

EDYS 234. Civil Rights in Uncivil Societies (1). Students explore the meanings of human rights, civil society, and justice/injustice as they have developed since the mid-19th century, comparing cases from North America with cases from other regions. Most cases relate to youth-related issues, including education and schooling, health and hygiene, criminal and juvenile justice, political activism, and welfare systems. Coursework addresses the means that dominant groups employ to incorporate, exclude, and/or civilize and control the less powerful, with special attention to race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Attention is given to how dominant groups enculturate their others, how members of subordinate groups understand the dominant culture and act from their own social position, and how all of these various actors interact with the State. Students research, discuss, and write about case materials in conjunction with explorations of theories drawn from several disciplines, including philosophy, political science, anthropology, and literature. Students engage in local internship/service experiences related to course materials. This will be a discussion-oriented course requiring short papers, participation in class activities, including field trip, class presentations, et al. (Also listed as Interdisciplinary Studies 276.) Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

EDYS 246. Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language (1). This course is designed for students who are interested in teaching English as a second or foreign language (ESL/EFL). It includes foundational information on the theories, contexts, and methodology of language acquisition, as well as an overview of current socio-political issues related to teaching English abroad. Students will examine, discuss, and apply aspects of the following topics: intercultural communication, curriculum development and lesson planning, skill-based methodology, language assessment, materials critiques, computer/technology-aided learning, resource development, classroom research, and socio-cultural theory. Field experience, classroom observations, and practice teaching are included.

EDYS 252. Developing Mathematical Reasoning and Numeracy (1). This course explores the question, “What does it mean to think mathematically?” Humans have invented systems of numbers and symbols to facilitate thought, action, and communication about space, time, and quantity. How are these systems and their components learned and taught? How is competency in using these systems promoted and assessed? This course explores these and other questions through the study of mathematics education texts, along with practice teaching, learning, and doing mathematics. The standards and principles developed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics provide a structure for designing and evaluating the materials examined and developed in this course. Includes weekly classes taught in the elementary school. Offered alternate spring terms. Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies 101 or 102, 151, and 204, or consent of instructor.

EDYS 260. Museum Education and Informal Learning (1). See Museum Studies 260 for description.

EDYS 262. Exploring Language, Literature, and Literacy (1). This course is a theoretical and practical investigation into teaching and learning about the language arts from first through eighth grades. Designed for students to study and teach reading approaches, including whole language and phonics, and for students to be able to study and direct writing activities for creative and analytical purposes. An emphasis will be given to teaching pupils with a range of social, intellectual, emotional, and physical abilities. Topics include characteristics of emergent readers, development of second language learners, literature for children and early adolescents, and assessments in reading and writing for middle childhood and early adolescents. Includes a weekly placement in an elementary school. Offered alternate fall terms. Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies 101 or 102, 151, and 164 or Critical Identity Studies 204.

EDYS 267. Curricula and Theories for Adolescents (1). This course is an in-depth examination of the philosophy and history of U.S. middle school education and middle school curriculum theory (development and implementation), and methods of instruction. An integral part will be to learn how to address issues of diversity that are embedded in relationships among students, teachers, and communities. Course work will include studying a range of teaching strategies, investigating student evaluation and assessment practices, and analyzing classroom organization and management theories and practices. Students will develop the structure and content of their teaching portfolios. Includes a weekly placement in a middle school. (3B) Offered each fall. Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies 101 or 102, 151, and 164 or Critical Identity Studies 204.

EDYS 272. Investigating the Natural World (1). This course takes a constructivist approach to teaching, learning, and doing science. Students study theories of science education and examine past and current science curricula and instruction associated with those theories. Students design and perform science investigations, and then guide a group of elementary school children in designing and performing their own investigations. They design curricula and practice instruction and assessment in the areas of life science, physical science, earth and space science, and environmental science. Includes a weekly placement in an elementary school. Offered alternate fall terms. Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies 101 or 102, 151, and 204.

EDYS 276. Advanced Topics in Education and Youth Studies (1). This course addresses special issues or aspects of education and youth studies based on the particular interests and expertise of the instructor. Since the course title and content will vary with the instructor, it may be repeated for credit once, when the title and content change. For example, past topics have included policy, law, comparative education, service learning, ethics, affirmative action, gender, and African “coming of age” literature. When this course is offered with an international focus, it serves as a prerequisite for overseas student teaching and field experiences. Offered most semesters. Prerequisite: varies by topic.

EDYS 277. Pedagogies and Methods for Adolescents (1). This course focuses on teaching in a specific content area and preparing for full-time student teaching. Following up on the theoretical aspects of Education and Youth Studies 267, this course explores pedagogical approaches to working with pupils at the early adolescence/late adolescence stage. Methods of teaching will include specifics of lesson planning and teaching, classroom management and organization, technologies in the classroom, and pupil assessment and evaluation, all within specific disciplinary areas. Once a week, students will meet as a group with the instructor of the course to experiment with general pedagogical practices, e.g., cooperative groups, peer evaluation, etc. Students will also attend regular meetings with a “special methods” teacher in order to get practical experience teaching in their subject area. A week-long teaching practicum for one period a day, with a college supervisory visit, will be evaluated during the term. The assessment for the course is based on participation, class performance, and portfolio assignments. Includes a weekly placement in a high school. Offered each spring. Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies 101 or 102, 151, and Education and Youth Studies 164/Critical Identity Studies 204.

EDYS 282. Encountering Social and Historical Worlds (1). Focusing on history and social science, this course explores theories, practices, and purposes of social studies education. Readings are interdisciplinary, with texts from education, history, anthropology, psychology, and cultural studies. Students engage in curriculum development and implementation with teachers and students at elementary and middle schools. Students work on individual research projects in consultation with experts at college and local archives, museums, historical and archaeological sites, and other sites of cultural interest. Includes a weekly placement in a middle school. Offered alternate spring terms. Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies 101 or 102, 151, and 204.

EDYS 296. Research: Principles and Methods (1). An in-depth, critical introduction to principles and methods of education research. Major forms and types of education research, including large and small-scale projects that use psychological, historical, sociological, anthropological, and interdisciplinary approaches employing qualitative and quantitative methods, will be explored and critically analyzed. Students will design, plan, complete, and evaluate a comprehensive research project in education. Methodological and content focus varies according to instructor and student interest. When this course is offered with an international focus, it serves as a prerequisite for overseas student teaching and field experiences. Offered each spring. Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies 101 or 102, 151, and 204.

EDYS 302. Student Teaching in Elementary/Middle School (1-3). Students will participate in a full semester teaching experience with responsibilities for lesson planning, teaching, and evaluation, in addition to parent-teacher conferences, department meetings, and extracurricular activities. A cooperating teacher in students’ respective disciplines and a Beloit College supervisor will mentor students to help develop professional teaching habits and evaluate student teaching progress. Graded credit/no credit. Offered each fall. (CP) Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDYS 304. Student Teaching in Middle/Secondary School (1-3). Students will participate in a full semester teaching experience with responsibilities for lesson planning, teaching, and evaluation, in addition to parent-teacher conferences, department meetings, and extracurricular activities. A cooperating teacher in students’ respective disciplines and a Beloit College supervisor will mentor students to help develop professional teaching habits and evaluate student teaching progress. Graded credit/no credit. Offered each fall. (CP) Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDYS 306. Fieldwork: Youth and Education (.5-3). Students will undertake an intensive, supervised experience in close conjunction with a faculty mentor with whom they maintain frequent communication, in-person when possible and otherwise by electronic means. Students assume responsible participant roles within diverse field settings, while observing in a systematic, reflective way. Placements are made in a wide variety of local, regional, national, and international settings. One unit of credit requires 120 hours in the field. Students may, with approval, substitute term-long, off-campus programs with youth or education dimensions for this fieldwork requirement. Offered every term. Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies 101 or 102, 151, and 204, and 296/consent of instructor.

EDYS 310. Student Teaching: Overseas (1-3). Students practice-teach in an overseas primary, middle, or secondary school. During the term, they assume the full responsibility of a teacher. Students are under the close supervision of an experienced classroom teacher, as well as the head teacher of the school. Students make regular reports to the director of overseas student teaching. In most instances, they are visited by a faculty member from Beloit College. The course is open to students who have been admitted to the Beloit College overseas student teaching program. Graded credit/no credit. Available any semester. Ninth-term tuition remission not available. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDYS 382. Senior Thesis (1). Education and youth studies seniors pursue individual inquiry in education and youth studies under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are encouraged to expand on issues or problems they have already studied or encountered in their academic careers. A student’s final product may be in one of the following three forms: 1) a capstone project closely tied to their previous fieldwork as well as future career options , including a written paper/report , the specific format and length to be determined in consultation with the faculty supervisor; 2) a research paper based on fieldwork and research s/he has previously done (usually 25 pages or more, double-spaced); or 3) an honors thesis (for those students who are eligible and are nominated to write an honors thesis) that is a high-quality research paper of at least 35 pages double-spaced. In addition to taking EDYS 382, students writing an honors thesis must meet additional criteria in consultation with their academic advisor and the EDYS department. Students writing an honors thesis or academic research paper are required to present at Student Symposium, while all other students are strongly encouraged to present as well. (CP) Prerequisite: Education and Youth Studies 296 and 306 (2-3 units) or recommendation of the department.

EDYS 390. Special Projects (.25 - 1). Research work under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

EDYS 395. Teaching Assistant (.5). Work with faculty member in classroom instruction. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

EDYS 396. Teaching Assistant Research (.5). Course and curriculum development projects with faculty member(s). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

EDYS 397. Research Assistant (.5). Assistance to an education and youth studies faculty member in scholarly research. Prerequisite: education and youth studies major. Departmental approval.