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Courses


Mount Making: The Design and Fabrication of Archival Mounts for Exhibits

July 25-28, 2018

Course Description

This course will give each student practical "hands on" experience:  designing mounts; evaluating and using archival materials; making of coated brass and stainless steel pin mounts; fabric wrapping ethafoam and acrylic forms; cutting, heat bending, and polishing of acrylic; and silver brazing brass mounts.  In addition, each student will be encouraged to present to the class any particular mount making challenges they are currently or will soon be working on at their jobs.

About the Instructors

Pam Gaible is the mount shop supervisor at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago.  She has over 20 years experience designing and fabricating archival mounts.  She has made mounts for a large variety of objects including:  dinosaur fossils, Egyptian mummies, Pacific island ceremonial objects, African textiles, Native American clothing, animal skeletons, and meteorites.  Major exhibits at the Field Museum which Pam has worked on include "Kremlin Gold: 1000 Years of Russian Gems and Jewels", "Cleopatra of Egypt", "Cartier - 1900 to 1939", "Scrolls from the Dead Sea", "Inside Ancient Egypt", "Traveling the Pacific", "Africa", "Life over Time", and "What is an Animal?".  She has a Master of Fine Arts degree in Sculpture from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln.

Earl Lock, is a Mount Maker, Exhibit Designer and Fabricator in private practice in Chicago, with over 20 years experience designing and fabricating exhibit components for natural history museums, art museums, and planetariums.  He holds a Masters of Fine Arts degree from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and has made archival mount for major exhibits at The Field Museum, The Adler Planetarium, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Lincoln Museum in Fort Wayne, Indiana, the Speed Art Museum, and the Frazier Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, The Chicago History Museum, The Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, and private collectors across the country.


Introduction to Textile Conservation

July 25-28, 2018

Course Description

This course will provide essential skills needed for all collections-care specialists to handle, assess, maintain, and safely house historic clothing and textiles. Beginning with the basic chemical building blocks of textile fibers, students will learn how fabricss’ microscopic characteristics impact the preservation, treatment, and interpretation of textile objects. Advancements in textile technology over the last 300 years will be highlighted and the challenges they present to museum staff will be discussed. Armed with a better understanding of the needs of historic clothing and textiles, participants will learn hands-on skills such as condition reporting, surface cleaning, exhibition, packing, and photography. Environmental and practical considerations for the care and display of textiles will be presented along with case studies in successful and problematic conservation solutions. Working with study collection pieces from Beloit College, as well as their own objects, students will create a treatment proposal, carry out basic treatment steps, and complete a final assessment report. Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop, a downloadable camera/phone, and a small, clean textile if they desire. Sewing skills are not required.

About the Instructor

Camille Myers Breeze began her conservation career in 1989 at the Textile Conservation Workshop in South Salem, New York. After earning a BA in Art History from Oberlin College, Camille received an MA in Museum Studies: Costume and Textiles Conservation from the Fashion Institute of Technology. She spent five years in the Textile Conservation Laboratory at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City before moving to the Textile Conservation Center at the American Textile History Museum, in Lowell, Massachusetts. Camille founded Museum Textile Services in 1999 as a full-service textile conservation studio serving museums, historical societies, and private collectors. In 2015 she co-founded the Andover Figures® line of custom museum forms for conservators and collections specialists. Camille is an instructor at the International Preservation Studies Center and has taught elsewhere in the United States, the Dominican Republic, and Peru.


Introduction to the Care of Paper Collections

July 25-28, 2018

Course Description

This course is an introduction to caring for and preserving paper-based collections. Participants will learn the history of paper manufacture and the factors affecting its deterioration; the basics of caring for a storing paper collections; as well as learn basic hands-on treatments for repairing paper collection materials including humidification and flattening, dry cleaning, mending, and filling losses. Students will learn about the benefits of washing and deacidification as well as better understand when such treatments may be in advisable. Each student is encouraged to bring paper artifacts of their own for treatment where they will apply what they learned under the guidance of the instructor.

About the Instructor

Jennifer Hain Teper serves as the Velde Preservation Librarian at the University of Illinois Libraries overseeing conservation, collections care, digital preservation, and digitization services throughout the library system. Before her current position began in 2009, she served as the head of conservation at the University of Illinois libraries from 2001-2008. Jennifer graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in August of 2000 with a MLIS and Certificate of Advanced Study in the Conservation and Preservation of Library and Archival Materials. She teaches several preservation and conservation related courses in the Graduate School of Information Science at the University of Illinois and also serves as an instructor at the International Preservation Studies Center (formerly the Campbell Center). Her current research interests focus on the prioritization of preservation actions in academic and research libraries relative to holdings in shared print repositories and digital access. She is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works where she serves as the Chair of the Equity and Inclusion Working Group.


Introduction to Digitization

July 25-27, 2018

Course Description

This course provides an overview of the steps needed to begin a digitization project with a focus on 2-dimensional archival items, including photographs, slides, negatives, and correspondence. Participants will take part in exercises designed to encourage appropriate planning for digital object creation and manipulation. This course also includes a hands-on component in which participants will learn how to properly use EPSON scanners and image editing software to create archival quality digital files.

About the Instructor

Josh Hickman is the Digital Resources Librarian at Beloit College. He has over a decade of experience digitizing archival collections. Josh has been involved with the biennial Upper Midwest Digital Collections Conference both as a presenter and as a planning committee member. He is also an active member of the Wisconsin Library Association and currently serves on its Board of Directors. Josh holds a BA in Psychology from Marquette University and a Master of Library and Information Science degree from the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee. He lives in Janesville, WI, where he enjoys volunteering at the Rock County Historical Society.


Preservation of Photographs

July 26-28, 2018

Course Description

Participants will learn to differentiate the major black & white photographic processes, both prints and negatives – everything from daguerreotypes to gelatin developed-out photographs, from paper negatives to nitrate film. We will do this by reviewing the history of photography, understanding how photographs deteriorate, and examining lots of images.  Process identification will become the key to determining how best to preserve photographs.  While discussing proper storage materials and the best environments, we’ll delineate the special needs of each process. Can they be exhibited safely? Are they prone to abrasion? Are special storage enclosures ever recommended? Which processes require freezer storage to survive? Participants will be encouraged to ask questions and to bring items for discussion.

About the Instructor

Gary Albright has been consulting, treating, and teaching about photographs for over 40 years.  For the past 15 years he has been an art conservator in private practice.  Before that he was conservator at the George Eastman House, Rochester, NY. and senior paper and photograph conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center, Andover, MA.  During his career he has treated a diverse array of objects, including the Emancipation Proclamation, a Honus Wagner baseball card, Ansel Adams’ photographs, and working drafts of the Constitution of the United States.  Since 2003, Albright has been the guest professor of photograph conservation at the State University at Buffalo.  In 2017 he received the American Institute for Conservation’sSheldon & Caroline Keck Award in recognition of a sustained record of excellence in the education and training of conservation professionals.  Albright lives and works in Honeoye Falls, New York.