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Beloit College

1988 Hall of Honor

Jerry Alan Donley
Of the Class of 1951

“Doing what comes naturally” – that’s what pole vaulting is to Jerry Donley.  Today, 37 years since his last collegiate appearance, he is still vaulting…still winging…still setting records.  He is a three-time Midwest Conference champion whose top Beloit effort of 13 feet 9 inches remains the school mark; it was set when the world collegiate record was 14-11 ½.  Once a second-place finisher at the prestigious Kansas Relays, he qualified for both NCAA and AALL meets as a senior, but a broken collar bone prevented him from competing.  Donley returned to vaulting in 1974 and regularly clears 12-6 to 13 feet.  He has won the world and U.S. masters championships including the national crown with a vault of 12-4 in the 55-through-59 age group last summer in Eugene, Oregon, and two titles in the International World Association of Veteran Athletes Games.  Donley chairs the masters track and field committee of the U.S. Athletics Congress and is a prime mover in seeking the 1989 Veteran Athletes Games for this nation.  An attorney in Colorado Springs, where he officiates Air Force Academy meets and serves as head vault judge for the Olympic Festival, Donley also participates in the long jump, hurdles, dashes, and decathlon, in which he was national champion for the 50-54 age bracket.

Lyle J. Hope
Swimming, Golf Coach, 1946-53

An outstanding Janesville High School and LaCrosse State Teachers College athlete who first became a prep coach, Lyle Hope joined the Beloit staff following World War II naval service and developed highly successful programs in swimming and golf.  His Buccaneer swimming teams won 44 dual meets and lost only 10, all to university squads, in seven years; in five seasons of Midwest Conference competition, they captured three league championships and finished second twice.  Holding all Beloit pool records, they were undefeated in 18 consecutive meets over a three-year period.  Hope directed the mermen to two Midwest Invitational Meet titles and to the 1953 Central Collegiate Conference championship, and he was instrumental in developing all-America swimmer Chet Otis, also a Hall of Honor member.  Hope’s golf teams excelled too; the 1952 squad compiled a school-record 10-1 mark, ad the 1953 team finished at 8-3.  Hope also served as freshman football coach, head of the physical education program, director of intramurals, and member of the faculty, athletic and scholarship committees.  He left coaching in 1953 to accept an industrial sales promotion position with the Besly-Welles Corp; now a manufacturer’s representative, he is president of Hope Enterprises in Elmhurst, Illinois.

Joseph John Tamulis
Of the Class of 1939

Beloit native Joe Tamulis arrived on campus with impressive prep credentials and proceeded to expand upon them on the intercollegiate level.  He earned all-conference and all-state basketball recognition during three varsity seasons including first team berths in both as a junior and senior.  A high-scoring center who was a dominant offensive factor and a defensive stalwart, “Jumping Joe” was Beloit’s leader in field-goal and free-throw percentage and helped the 1938 club to the school’s best showing in 14 years – a 12-4 record and second-place finish in the conference.  He tallied a team-high 183 points that season and netted 161 as a senior, when he was captain.  A versatile three-year man in track, he competed in the shot put, discus, high and broad jump, and javelin, and placed in the broad jump as a sophomore in the first Beloit Relays.  Tamulis served two years as football trainer and was recipient of the Outstanding Senior Athlete Award.  He was a biochemistry graduate student at the University of Wisconsin before entering the Marine Corps.  A decorated veteran of World War II and Korea, he retired as a colonel after nearly 40 years in the active reserves.  Tamulis presently is regional sales manager of the chemical division of Eagle Picher Industries in LaGrange, Illinois.