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Department of

Critical Identity Studies


Investigating how gender, race, ethnicity, socio-economic class, sexuality, dis/ ability, nation, non/religiosity, and region shape identities.

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Critical Identity Studies

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Understanding Identities

Combining a variety of academic disciplines (gender and women’s studies, ethnic studies, queer studies, disability studies, postcolonial studies), critical identity studies investigates the ways in which gender, race, ethnicity, socio-economic class, sexuality, dis/ ability, nation, non/religiosity, and region shape identities within structures of inequality and through systems and practices of power and resistance. As such, critical identity studies is necessarily interdisciplinary, intersectional, and oriented toward social justice.

Interconnected by design

Both the major and the minor use core and cross-listed courses to engage students in an investigation of theoretical approaches to, and experiential-based learning about, the historical, political, social, and cultural processes of identity formation. Ultimately, critical identity studies fosters in students an awareness of the ways in which identities are multiple, embedded in relations of power, and foundational to modes of operating in the world.

From the introductory course, “Sex and Power,” to the advanced theoretical courses which include “Whiteness,” “Masculinities,” “Gender Bending,” “Race and Culture,” “Feminism and Politics,” “‘Black Lives Matter,” and “Thinking Queerly,” CRIS courses are always interdisciplinary, intersectional, and oriented toward social justice. As such, Critical Identity Studies emphasizes the importance of communicating across differences as a means to fulfill the College’s mission of empowering students “to lead fulfilling lives marked by high achievement, personal responsibility, and public contribution in a diverse society.”

Nov11th

Ivan Stone Lecture: Statelessness and Inclusion - Amal de Chickera

What does it mean to be “Stateless?” A person who is stateless has been denied the right to nationality and citizenship.

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Genia Stevens’00

Building an Ecosystem for Black Businesses

Entrepreneur Genia Stevens’00 is all about supporting other Black business owners, helping them clear some of the hurdles she has faced.

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