WHAT IS A GEOLOGIC MAP AND HOW IS IT USED?

G. Richard Whittecar
Department of Geological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk, Virginia 23529


Level: High School and College

 

Anticipated Learning Outcomes

Materials


Procedure (before class)

  1. Mold surface of sand into realistic "landscape" (flat or hilly).
  2. Fasten string across box to form coarse grid of squares; prepare copies of base map showing box outline and grid.
  3. Each paper circle represents an outcrop of a sedimentary rock (colors represent different rock formations) lying at a given attitude (angle of the circle stuck into the sand). Place "outcrops" across the "landscape" according to a predetermined pattern to represent flat, tilted, folded, and/or faulted strata.
  4. Each student should do the following for each "outcrop":
    a. Locate the "outcrop" on her/his base map and mark its location with a small colored dot.
    b. Draw a short line on top of that dot to indicate the strike direction of that "outcrop."
    c. (optional) Draw a short line on top of that dot to indicate the dip direction of that "outcrop."
  5. After numerous "outcrops" are marked, students should draw black lines ("contacts") to separate areas of the map with different colored dots. Lines should roughly parallel the strike lines of nearby outcrops. Lightly color all formations on the map.
  6. Ask students to predict what rock types are hidden underground between selected "outcrops" and to explain their logic.

 

Discussion


Reference

Whittecar, G.R. 1984. Terrain models in field geology courses. Journal of Geological Education 32:153-155.

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