North America

The following list includes all of the locations in North America represented in the Logan Museum Collections.

Arctic and Subarctic
Northwest Coast
Great Lakes
Northeast
California Great Basin
Southwest
Great Plains
Southeast


Arctic and Subarctic

Alaskan Inuit
The Alaskan Inuit live in western Canada and Alaska. The Aleut occupy the Aleutian Islands. As many of our artifacts are identified only as "Eskimo", we have combined the art of these Arctic peoples into this category. Ivory work is most easily associated with the Inuit, but they were equally skilled at basketmaking.

The Logan Museum has a small number of objects from the Alaska Inuit and Aleut.

Labrador Inuits
The Labrador Inuits live in northeastern Canada.

The Logan Museum has a small number of ivory objects from the Labrador Inuit.


Northwest Coast

Tlingit
The Tlingit people live in the coastal areas of northwestern British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. The three- dimensional sculpture of the Tlingit is generally somewhat realistic, while two-dimensional art is far more abstract and conventionalized. The Chilkat, a subgroup of the Tlingit, are noted particularly for their woven blankets.

The Logan Museum has a number of objects from the Tlingit, including basketry, beadwork, utilitarian objects and a Chilkat blanket.

Tsimshian
The Tsimshian people live along the northwestern coast of British Columbia, Canada.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Tsimshian jewelry.

Haida
The Haida people live on the Queen Charlotte Islands off the western coast of British Columbia. The Haida population was dramatically reduced in the 19th century by an epidemic of smallpox, and by the 20th century the Haida had adopted a more European lifestyle. The demands of collectors in the late 1800s assured that traditional crafts would be remembered.

The Logan Museum has a respectable collection of Haida objects, including masks, wooden objects and argillite pieces.

Salish
The Salish occupy the Fraser and Thompson River valleys of southern British Columbia. They are noted for their baskets, especially rectangular. These baskets are usually "imbricated", meaning that the pattern is created by weaving in strips of colored grass, creating a patternn like a tile roof.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Salish baskets.


Great Lakes

Archaeology
People have lived in the Great Lakes region for over 13,000 years. Archaeological sites such as mounds, camps, and villages exist throughout the region. Artifacts made by ancient peoples of the Great Lakes region include a wide variety of stone, pottery, and metal objects.

The Logan Museum has thousands of archaeological objects from the Great Lakes region, ranging in age from the earliest Paleo-Indian cultures to the Historic fur-trading and logging eras.

Ojibwa
The Ojibwa peoples live in northern Michigan Wisconsin, Minnesota and southern Manitoba and Ontario. They are primarily hunters and fishermen, working the shores of the Great Lakes.

The Logan Museum has a large collection of Ojibwa artifacts, mostly beaded work and clothing.

Menomonee
The Menomonee people live in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Like the Dakota to the west, they relied on wild rice as their staple, supplementing it through hunting and fishing.

The Logan Museum has a large collection of Menomonee objects.

Hochunk
The Hochunk people live in central Wisconsin. In the 19th century they were forced westward, but returned a short time later. Lacking arable farmland, the Hochunk are primarily hunters, trappers and fishermen.

The Logan Museum has a substantial collection of Hochunk material, including basketry, tools, leather, beadwork, clothing and daily-use objects.

Potawatomi
The Potawatomi people have been spread throughout the Midwest, with settlements from Kansas to southern Ontario. In deference to the wishes of the Potawatomi people, most of our artifacts have been sealed, viewable only by members of the Potawatomi nation.

The Logan Museum has a large collection of beaded work, clothing and baskets from the Potawatomi.


Northeast

Seneca
The Seneca people live in western New York. They are one of the Five Nations of the Iroquois, part of a league established in the 17th century.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of musical instruments, tools, weapons and baskets.

Micmac
The Micmac people live in New Brunswick, Canada. They are one of the Algonkian peoples, who occupy the greater portion of the coastal Northeast. Micmac beadwork has a long and storied history, and was much admired by European traders. The Micmac also excelled at quillwork, weaving porcupine quills into basketry and textiles.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Micmac beadwork and quilled basketry.

Iroquois
The Iroquois people live in northern New York and eastern Ontario. The early Iroquois lived in fortified towns. In the late 16th century, the League of the Five Nations of the Iroquois was established, including the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca. Other Iroquois groups - the Huron, Tionontati, Neutral and Erie - remained outside the League, and were often adversarial to its members.

The Logan Museum has a significant collection of Iroquois baskets, beadwork and false-face masks.

Penobscot
The Penobscot people live in northern Maine. They are one of the Algonkian peoples. They are primarily recognized for their baskets, though this art has largely been lost. Older baskets tend to be coiled or built up of bands of varying materials.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Penobscot baskets.


California Great Basin

Hupa
The Hupa, Yurok and Karuk peoples live in northern California, strung out along the Klamath and Trinity River valleys. Despite speaking unrelated languages, they intermingled and lived very similar lifestyles. As such, it is difficult to discern from exactly which culture many of the artifacts from this area derive, and we have grouped them together under the term "Hupa".

The Logan Museum has a number of objects from the Klamath River area, including baskets, leather and shell goods.

Shasta
The Shasta people live in northern California. They are noted for their basketry, in which they employ a technique known as "full-twist overlay", where pairs of differently colored fibers were twisted fully so that both exterior and interior of the basket were the same color. In the Northwest, basketry was often also the preferred mode for hat-making.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Shasta basketry.

Pomo
The Pomo people live along the coast of central California. The Pomo create a wide variety of baskets, from the most utilitarian to elaborate gift baskets employing quail feathers and beading.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Pomo baskets.

Tulare
The Tulare people live in south-central California. They are often associated with the Yokuts people who live further east.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of baskets from the Tulare.

Washo
The Washo people live along the border of California and Nevada.

The Washo are particularly noted for their beaded baskets, which are usually rather small, and globular in shape. The Logan Museum has a small collection of beaded baskets from the Washo.

Shoshone
The Shoshone people live in central Idaho. They are known primarily for their fine beaded work, a tradition carried on even today in the beaded tennis shoes worn by the modern Shoshone.

The Logan Museum has a significant collection of objects from the Shoshone, including beadwork, clothing and tools.

Paiute
The Paiute people live in southwestern Utah. They are known for their beadwork and utilitarian basketry, including specially treated baskets for carrying water.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of beaded work from the Paiute.


Southwest

Ancient Cultures
The prehistoric cultures of the Southwest have now been combined into a virtual exhibition.

Modern Cultures

Hopi
The Hopi live in northeastern corner of Arizona. They can trace their ancestry all the way back to the Anasazi Basketmakers.

Hopi pottery was revived just before the turn of the 20th century, using newly-excavated pottery from the site at Sikyatki as models. Slips range from white to buff, decorated with stylized birds or kachina figures. The Logan Museum has a small collection of Hopi pottery and Sikyatki ware, a variety of baskets and a large collection of Kachina dolls.

Navajo
The Navajo people live in northwestern New Mexico. Like the Apache, the Navajo appear to derive from the Athabascans of western Canada, having migrated to the region in the late 15th century. Unlike the Apache, who remained somewhat nomadic, the Navajo eventually adopted a lifestyle closer to that of the neighboring Pueblos, but continued to live in small scattered camps rather than towns.

The Logan Museum has over 250 Navajo rugs, as well as a variety of other small woven objects.

Apache
The Apache people live throughout New Mexico. They are apparently derived from a group of Athabascans who migrated southward from western Canada. The Apache took over lands abandoned by the Pueblo peoples. They were until recent times a culture which valued mobility, and as such had not been involved in crafts which involved financial investment, such as weaving and metalwork. Their baskets, however, demonstrate considerable artistic skill.

The Logan Museum has a large collection of Apache basketry.

Mojave
The Mojave inhabit the lower Colorado River valley in Southern California. Their older pottery is generally red-on-buff, decorated with linear patterns and dots. Also common are ceramic dolls, fully dressed and garnished with beads.

Mojave and Yuma wares are very similar. In human figures, Mojave figures tend to have larger noses. The Logan Museum has a number of objects from the Mojave, both pottery and dolls.

Akimel O'odham
The Akimel O'odham people (formerly referred to as the Pima) live in south-central Arizona. They are the descendents of the earlier Hohokam peoples, and like their predecessors, the Akimel O'odham live in rancherias, which are communities strung out along irrigation channels or streams.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Akimel O'odham basketry.

Tohono O'odham
The Tohono O'odham people live in southern Arizona. Formerly referred to as "Papago", after the Papaguería region in which they lived. They are related to the Akimel O'odham, who ultimately derive from the Hohokam. Like the Akimel O'odham, they live in rancherias, communities strung out along streams and irrigation channels.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Tohono O'odham basketry.

Maricopa
The Maricopa live in Arizona in two communities: The Salt River Akimel O'odham-Maricopa Indian Community and the Gila River Indian Community. The Maricopa are thought to have separated from the Yuma and to have moved up the Colorado River to the lower Gila River in Arizona. The Maricopa are known for their dark red pottery decorated with black designs applied with mesquite sap.

Pueblo

Zuni
The Zuni Pueblo is located in northwestern New Mexico near the border with Arizona.

Zuni Pueblo pottery has a bright white slip, and is decorated with black designs highlighted with red accents. Rosettes and scrolls flanked by triangles are common geometric motifs, while the characteristic animal motif is the deer with white rump and "heart line", an arrow-like red line which runs from the mouth to the stomach of the animal. The Logan Museum has an extensive collection of Zuni pottery.

Hopi
The Hopi live in northeastern corner of Arizona. They can trace their ancestry all the way back to the Anasazi Basketmakers.

Hopi pottery was revived just before the turn of the 20th century, using newly-excavated pottery from the site at Sikyatki as models. Slips range from white to buff, decorated with stylized birds or kachina figures. The Logan Museum has a small collection of Hopi pottery and Sikyatki ware, a variety of baskets and a large collection of Kachina dolls.

Cochiti
The Cochiti Pueblo is in northern New Mexico, about 20 miles west of Santa Fe on the Rio Grande.

Cochiti pottery has a yellowish or pinkish slip, and is decorated with black designs. The Cochiti Pueblo is renowned for its effigy figures. The Logan Museum has a small number of objects from the Cochiti Pueblo.

Acoma
The Acoma Pueblo is in northwestern New Mexico, about 55 miles west of Albuquerque.

Acoma pottery is very thin and hard, and usually has a white slip. Patterns are generally all-over geometric, but may also include birds. The Logan Museum has a moderate collection of Acoma ceramics.

Zia
The Zia Pueblo is in northern New Mexico, about 30 miles north of Albuquerque.

Zia Pueblo pottery usually has a white or buff slip, and is decorated with a variety of geometric patterns or animal motifs. The Logan Museum has a varied collection of Zia Pueblo pottery.

San Ildefonso
The San Ildefonso Pueblo is in northern New Mexico, about 15 miles north of Santa Fe.

Although the San Ildefonso Pueblo is famous for its black-on-black wares, the creation of Maria Martinez and her husband Julian, they produce a variety of polychrome wares as well.  The Logan Museum has a number of objects from the San Ildefonso Pueblo, including several by Maria Martinez.

Santa Clara
The Santa Clara Pueblo is in northern New Mexico, about 20 miles northwest of Santa Fe, along the Rio Grande.

The Santa Clara Pueblo produces both polished black wares and a newer variety of red ware. The Logan Museum has a number of objects from the Santa Clara Pueblo.

Picuris
The Picuris Pueblo is in northern New Mexico, about 40 miles northeast of Santa Fe.

The Picuris Pueblo produces only unpainted pottery, made from a gold-tan clay rich in mica, giving the pottery a glittery finish. The Logan Museum has several ceramic pots from the Picuris Pueblo.

Santo Domingo
The Santo Domingo Pueblo is in northern New Mexico, about 25 miles southwest of Albuquerque along the Rio Grande.

Santo Domingo Pueblo pottery is distinguished by its cream slip decorated with large, simple geometric designs or birds. Black-on-black wares are a relatively recent addition. The Logan Museum has a small collection of Santo Domingo Pueblo pottery.

San Juan
The San Juan Pueblo is in northern New Mexico, about 30 miles north of Albuquerque along the Rio Grande.

The San Juan Pueblo produces natural red clay wares with a polished upper part and an unslipped lower portion. The Logan Museum has a small collection of San Juan Pueblo pottery.


Great Plains

Plains Cree
The Plains Cree people live in central Manitoba, Canada. They were bison hunters, heavily involved in the fur trade with Europeans moving westward across southern Canada.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of clothing from the Plains Cree.

Flathead
The Flathead live in western Montana.

The Logan Museum has a substantial number of objects from the Flathead, primarily beaded objects.

Crow
The Crow people, or Absaroke, live in central Montana. The Crow separated from the Hidatsa, probably around 1500, but interaction continued for several centuries. Unlike the Hidatsa, who lived in permanent settlements, the Crow were hunters and lived in tipis. They were exceptionally skilled at beadworking and quillwork. Like the Hidatsa, they also hunted bison, and buffalo robes painted with exploit scenes are common.

The Logan Museum has a sizeable number of objects from the Crow, from parfleches to beaded bandolier bags, clothing to dolls.

Blackfoot
The Blackfoot people now live in southern Alberta, Canada, and Montana. They were until very recently a nomadic people, leaving farming in the 14th century to become bison hunters.

The Logan Museum has a large collection of beaded work, clothing and leather goods from the Blackfoot.

Upper Missouri
The Hidatsa, Arikara and Numakiki (Mandan) cultures are peoples who lived along the Upper Missouri River in the very northern plains of the United States. They built permanent fortified towns, and were primarily agricultural. A smallpox epidemic in 1837 forced these three groups to band together to defend themselves against the Dakota and Assiniboine.

The Logan Museum has a large and varied collection of archaeological materials, lithics and ceramics from these cultures, as well as some fine buffalo robes from the Hidatsa.

Dakota
The Dakota people live in eastern South Dakota and western Iowa. They represent the eastern branch of the Sioux. They combined the harvesting of wild rice with maize cultivation, and also hunted deer and bison.

The Logan Museum has several objects from the Dakota, mostly clothing items.

Lakota
The Lakota people live in the western Dakotas, and represent the western branch of the Sioux. Living in the prairies, they relied on the bison as their greatest resource.

The Logan Museum has a large collection of Lakota work, primarily articles of clothing.

Cheyenne
The Cheyenne people live in western Wyoming. They originated in the area around western Wisconsin and Minnesota, gradually moving westward to eastern Wyoming.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Cheyenne leather, clothing  and daily-use objects.

Arapaho
The Arapaho people now live in the plains of eastern Colorado, having left eastern North Dakota and Minnesota in the late 18th century. They have historically been closely allied with the Cheyenne, whom they followed westward. They were primarily farmers of maize and bison hunters. Arapaho clothing is distinguished by the suppleness of the hides, and the bright dyes used to color them.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of clothing, leather, pipes, bags and daily-use objects from the Arapaho.

Kiowa
The Kiowa live in Oklahoma. The Kiowa were nomadic bison hunters often combining with the Comanche on raiding parties. The Kiowa originated in the north, at the headwaters of the Missouri in Montana.

The Logan Museum has a small of Kiowa objects.

Comanche
The Comanche people live in northern Texas. They are an offshoot of the Shoshone, having separated from that group in the 17th century. The Comanche were hunters and raiders, competing with the Apache for territory.

The Logan Museum has a small collection of Comanche leather objects and moccasins.


Southeast

Mississippian
"Mississippian" refers to a number of diverse cultures spread throughout the Mississippi River and its tributaries. These cultures were centered around major towns, such as Cahokia, Illinois; Aztalan, Wisconsin; Spiro, Oklahoma and Moundville, Alabama.

The Logan Museum has a substantial collection of Mississippian ceramics and archaeological material. These have now been combined into a comprehensive virtual exhibition, which can be view by visiting The Woodland and Mississippian Traditions.

Seminole
The Seminole people live in southern Florida. They are the descendants of Creeks who settled in southern Florida in the 18th century. The Seminole are noted for their ribbon-appliquéd skirts for women and long shirts, or foksikco.bi, for men.

The Logan Museum has a significant collection of Seminole tools, clothing and dolls.

Cherokee
The Cherokee people live in the western Carolinas. They are a matrilineal people, organized into clans of related persons. Many of the Cherokee were relocated in the 19th century to Oklahoma, but this branch ultimately dispersed, leaving those that remained in the East to carry on Cherokee traditions.

The Logan Museum has a number of objects from the Cherokee, primarily baskets.