Africa

The following list includes all of the locations in Central America represented in the Logan Museum Collections.

Stone Age
North Africa
East Africa
West Africa
Central Africa
South Africa


Stone Age
The Stone Age artifacts from the Logan Museum derive primarily from excavations of shell mounds undertaken in Algeria in 1930 by Alonzo Pond and George L. Collie of the Logan Museum.

The Logan Museum's collection includes flint, bone and shell artifacts and faunal remains numbering in the tens of thousands. They derive from a dozen sites, the most significant being Mechta El Arbi.


North Africa

Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egyptian culture extends back nearly 6000 years. The Egyptians were obsessed with death, believing that live was little more than a precursor to the afterlife. As such, burials were elaborate, and the majority of Egyptian artifacts relate to death and the afterlife.

The Logan Museum has an assortment of Egyptian objects, from Predynastic ceramics to Late Pharaonic sarcophagi.

Roman Africa
The Roman Empire embraced all territories surrounding the Mediterranean, including coastal North Africa. Numerous Roman towns have been excavated.

The Logan Museum has a small number of objects from Roman North Africa, especially oil lamps.

Tuareg
The Tuareg are a nomadic group inhabiting the Northern Sahara.

The Logan Museum has a variety of objects from the Tuareg, including numerous baskets and woven items, a pair of saddles and a complete Tuareg tent.

Berber
The term "Berber" refers to a number of groups living in the northern Sahara, including the Kabyles and the Aoulef.

The Logan Museum has a variety of Berber artifacts, primarily from the Aoulef.


East Africa

Sudan
The modern peoples of Sudan are influenced by both Islamic and Christian culture, but there is also a strong element of superstition to be found as well.

The Logan Museum has several leather objects from Sudan, likely from the Saharan areas of western Sudan.

Kenya
The modern peoples of Kenya rely heavily on tourism and agriculture for their economy.

The Logan Museum has several leather objects from Kenya, primarily modern jewelry.

Ethiopia
Ethiopia is located on the horn of Africa.

The Logan Museum has several ethnographic objects from Ethiopia.


West Africa

Bamana
The Bamana people are concentrated in western Mali. Bamana art has a distinctive style, most particularly the use of the antelope, which depicts the spirit of agriculture.

The Logan Museum has a small number of objects from the Bamana, including headresses and textiles.

Dogon
The Dogon have been concentrated in southwestern Mali for hundreds of years. The Dogon are known for their elaborate ceremonies for which a variety of masks are created. The Dogon also believe their ancestors watch over them, and they "protect" their homes and granaries with doors carved with a multitude of ancestor figures.

The Logan Museum has a number of objects from the Dogon, primarily ceremonial masks, a granary door and an assortment of door locks.

Yoruba
The Yoruba people live mostly in southwestern Nigeria and neighboring Benin and Togo. The Yorubo have a long tradition of carving, extending back to the Ife and Owo peoples of as early as the 6th century.

The Logan Museum has a variety of carved objects including figurines and ceremonial masks.

Ibibio
The Ibibio live in the area of the Lower Niger Delta and Cross River in Nigeria.

The Logan Museum has a small number of objects from the Ibibio.

Bobo
The Bobo people live in Upper Volta, north of the Black Volta River. They are largely people of the bush, farmers, hunters, and fishermen.

The Logan Museum has a small number of objects from the Bobo, mostly masks.

Mende
The Mende are centered in Sierra Leone in extreme West Africa.

The Logan Museum has a number of objects from the Mende, including several impressive ceremonial masks and textiles.

Senufo
The Senufo are distributed over a wide area of Mali, Burkina Faso and Ivory Coast. It is believed that they came into this area from the north some two to three hundred years ago.

The Logan Museum has a small number of ethnographic materials from the Senufo.

Baule
The Baule are of Akan origin and live in the northern half of the Ivory Coast. They are primarily known for their wood sculpture but are equally proficient in metalwork.

The Logan Museum has a small number of ethnographic materials from the Baule.


Central Africa

Cameroon
The BaMileke occupy the upper plateaus of western Cameroon. Wood sculpture is primary among the arts of the BaMileke.

The Logan Museum has a small number of BaMileke artifacts, primarily stools.


South Africa

Zulu
The Zulu peoples have occupied much of eastern South Africa for hundreds of years. 

The Logan Museum has a small collection of ethnographic objects from the Zulu peoples.