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Beloit figured prominently in today’s U.S. News rankings

August 17, 2010 at 9:12 am


Beloiters may be interested to see where Beloit College appeared in the annual U.S. News & World Report rankings of the “Best Colleges,” released today. The college is included in the upper reaches of its list of national liberal arts colleges, appears on lists celebrating a “strong commitment to teaching” and study abroad programs, and is 36th on a new ranking compiled using feedback from high school guidance counselors.

A quick breakout of the areas where Beloit was included:

National Liberal Arts Colleges

In its ranking of the top 250 liberal arts colleges nationwide, Beloit is included in the number 55 spot.

The High School Counselors’ Picks

In a new ranking that compiled ratings from 875 high school guidance counselors polled by U.S. News, Beloit was ranked 36th on a list of 63 liberal arts colleges. The college finished in an 11-way tie with institutions that included Colorado College, Kenyon, Haverford, Skidmore and Washington and Lee.

Strong Commitment to Teaching

Beloit was included on a short list of liberal arts colleges recognized for their “strong commitment to teaching,” based on ratings by administrators at regional peer institutions (Beloit was included at #34).  

Great Schools, Great Prices

Beloit also placed at 34th on a “best value” listing of 40 liberal arts colleges. The list is compiled by comparing each college’s U.S. News ranking with its cost. As the magazine points out, “Only schools ranked in or near the top half of their categories are included” in the analysis.

Strong Focus on Student Success – Study Abroad

Beloit was included on a list of 37 national colleges and universities recognized for their commitment to “substantial academic work abroad for credit… and considerable interaction with the local culture.”

A-Plus Schools for B Students

The college was also included in this year’s issue on a non-ranked listing of 76 national liberal arts colleges where good students – B students – have a “decent shot of being accepted and thriving.”